Napoleon: For and Against

By Pieter Geyl; Olive Renier | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
CHATEAUBRIAND

NAPOLEON had his detractors and his glorifiers, even during his lifetime. To see him as he appeared to his detractors it is not necessary to go to that part of Europe which opposed and finally brought him down. In his own France there were Chateaubriand and Mme de Staël, of whom the former painted a most repulsive picture of him at the critical moment after his first abdication, when the Bourbons were making their initial somewhat hesitating appearance on the scene.1

Chateaubriand is a figure of great importance in French literature, one of the very few which the period produced. Mme de Staël, however greatly her work may differ from his, is the only writer whom one would immediately and unhesitatingly place on the same level. Romanticism is vested in him, not only in his original, lively style, but in his attitude towards himself and towards life. He is the nobleman, homesick for the ancien régime, with a real feeling for those values of beauty and tradition imperilled by the Revolution. Yet he had too deep an understanding, too developed an historical instinct, to be a pure reactionary. At an early stage Chateaubriand had made his peace with the regime, he was a rallié, as it was called, and had established his reputation by the publication of Le Génie du Christianisme, a wholly emotional and traditionalist apology for Catholicism, on aesthetic and sociological lines, which made a tremendous hit at that moment of reaction against the anti-clerical tendencies of the Revolution, and served the reading public as suitable companion-piece to Bonaparte's Concordat. Young Chateaubriand was in good odour at the new Court, through the influence of Fontanes, the Consul-Emperor's Court poet and orator, himself a man of the ancien régime, but he was made of tougher stuff than the pliable, self-seeking Fontanes. Two courageous actions, at a time when Napoleon's power appeared unassailable, had earned him the right to attack the Emperor in 1814. In 1804, after the murder of the Duc d'Enghien, he resigned from the diplomatic service during the stricken silence

____________________
1
De Buonaparte, des Bourbons; 1814.

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Napoleon: For and Against
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 482

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.