Early Tudor Composers: Biographical Sketches of Thirty-Two Musicians and Composers of the Period 1485-1555

By W. Henry Hadow; William H. Grattan Flood | Go to book overview

VI. Hugh Aston

IT is no small compliment to the cult of early Tudor music to find a brilliant professor of the University of Brussels, M. Charles van den Borren, devoting much attention to the Sources of Key- board Music in England, and publishing the result of his researches in book form, of which an excellent English translation has been made by Mr. James E. Matthew1. In the opinion of Van den Borren, Hugh Aston is one of the most considerable figures in the development of virginal music of the early years of the six- teenth century, 'whose importance has not been sufficiently insisted upon by historians of music'. He gives many pages to an analysis of Aston's compositions, but in regard to his biography he is content with the bald statement that he was 'an organist and composer of sacred music of the time of Henry VIII ( 1509-47)'.

Probably the best account of Hugh Aston is that which is given in the new edition of Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, by Mr. Arkwright. The reader may also profitably consult the Carnegie edition. Yet the biographical data--apart from the list of compositions--can only be described as disappointing. Here it is: 'One of the leading English pre-Reformation composers (fl. 1500-20); his identity with an ecclesiastic of this name (for whom see the Dictionary of National Biography) cannot be proved.' Dr. Ernest Walker, in his History of Music in England ( 1907), says that Mr. Henry Davey's identification of Aston with an Archdeacon of York, who died in 1522, 'is purely conjectural' while Mr. Percy A. Scholes is content with the statement: Nothing is known of his life.'

The difficulty over the biography of Hugh Aston is heightened by reason of the name's being spelled variously as Aston, Ashton,

____________________
1
Novello ( 1915).

-30-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Early Tudor Composers: Biographical Sketches of Thirty-Two Musicians and Composers of the Period 1485-1555
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Note 7
  • Preface 8
  • Contents 11
  • I. Gilbert Banaster 13
  • Ii. David Burton 17
  • Iii. William Cornish 20
  • Iv. William Crane 23
  • V. William Newark 27
  • Vi. Hugh Aston 30
  • Vii. Richard Pygot 34
  • Viii. Robert Fayrfax 37
  • Ix. John Browne 40
  • X. Richard Hygons 43
  • Xi. Richard Bramston 46
  • Xii. John Taverner 49
  • Xiii. Thomas Farthing 52
  • Xiv. Thomas Ashwell 55
  • Xv. Richard Davy 60
  • Xvi. Robert Cowper, Mus.D. 64
  • Xvii. John Lloyd 66
  • Xviii. Robert Jones 69
  • Xix. Nicholas Ludford 72
  • Xx. Sir William Hawte 76
  • Xxi. William Pasche 79
  • Xxii. Richard Sampson 83
  • Xxiii. Simon Burton 86
  • Xxiv. William Whytbroke 89
  • Xxv. Thomas Knight 92
  • Xxvi. John Redford 95
  • Xxvii. Thomas Appleby 100
  • Xxviii. John Dygon 104
  • Xxix. John Gwynneth, Mus.Doc. 108
  • Xxx. Richard Edwards 112
  • Xxxi. Edward Higgins 116
  • Xxxii. William Parsons 119
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 126

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.