The Status of Palestinian Refugees in International Law

By Lex Takkenberg | Go to book overview

IX The Search for a Durable Solution

1. Introduction

The Palestinian refugee issue has remained unresolved for almost fifty years, longer than most other problems of mass displacement during this century. From the outset, the international community made it clear that it saw voluntary repatriation as the desirable solution to the problem and accordingly the General Assembly in 1948 resolved, in its historic resolution 194, that 'refugees wishing to return to their homes and live at peace with their neighbours should be permitted to do so at the earliest practicable date'.1 The implementation of this resolution was entrusted to the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine which made numerous attempts to promote the repatriation of the refugees.2 Israel, however, has consistently barred the return of the refugees except for small numbers in the context of family reunification.3 After it became clear that the Israeli government was unlikely to change its policy vis-à-vis the refugees, the international community explored alternative solutions. It created UNRWA, not only to continue the initial relief effort, but foremost to promote the 'reintegration' of the refugees into the economic life of the Middle East, either by integration in the countries of refuge or by resettlement in other countries in the region.4 These efforts also failed, however, and serious attempts at finding a durable solution were suspended by the mid-1950s. The Middle East peace process that started with the ' Madrid' conference in 1991, has for the first time after all these years brought a solution to the Palestinian refugee problem within reach.

The relevance of the ' Madrid' peace process for the Palestinian refugees has already been discussed in chapter I.5 The present chapter, the most 'political' chapter of the book, explores various aspects of the search for a durable solution to the Palestinian refugee problem in the context of that process. The next section discusses the different durable solutions to refugee problems in general and looks at various related principles of international law. The question, to what extent these

____________________
1
See ch. I, sub-section 5.3, and ch. VII, sub-section 2.2.
2
See ch. I, sub-section 5.3.
3
See ch. I, sub-section 3.3.
4
See ch. I, sub-section 5.4.
5
See ch. I, section 6.

-318-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Status of Palestinian Refugees in International Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 420

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.