Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader

By David Lodge; Nigel Wood | Go to book overview

SECOND EDITION


Modern Criticism and Theory
A Reader

Edited by
David Lodge

Revised and expanded by
Nigel Wood

An imprint of Pearson Education

Harlow, England London New York Reading, Massachusetts San Francisco Toronto Don Mills, Ontario Sydney Tokyo Singapore Hong Kong Seoul Taipei Cape Town Madrid Mexico City Amsterdam Munich Paris Milan

-iii-

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Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface to the Second Edition xv
  • Acknowledgements xvi
  • Chapter 1 - Ferdinand de Saussure 1
  • Notes 9
  • Chapter 2 - Walter Benjamin 10
  • Introductory Note - Nw 10
  • Chapter 3 - Roman Jakobson 30
  • Introductory Note-Dl 30
  • Notes 54
  • Notes 59
  • Chapter 4 - Jacques Lacan 61
  • Introductory Note - Dl 61
  • Notes 86
  • Chapter 5 - Jacques Derrida 88
  • Introductory Note - Dl 88
  • Notes 103
  • Chapter 6 - Mikhail Bakhtin 104
  • Introductory Note - Dl 104
  • Notes 135
  • Chapter 7 - Tzvetan Todorov 137
  • Introduction Note - Dl 137
  • Chapter 8 - Roland Barthes 145
  • Introductory Note -- Dl 145
  • Note 150
  • Notes 171
  • Chapter 9 - Michel Foucault 173
  • Introductory Note -- Dl 173
  • Chapter 10 - Wolfgang Iser 188
  • Introductory Note - Dl 188
  • Notes 204
  • Chapter 11 - Julia Kristeva 206
  • Introductory Note - Dl/Nw 206
  • Notes 216
  • Chapter 12 - Harold Bloom 217
  • Introductory Note - Dl/Nw 217
  • Chapter 13 - En D. Hirsch Jr. 230
  • Introductory Note-Dl/Nw 230
  • Notes 240
  • Chapter 14 - M. H. Abrams 241
  • Introductory Note-Dl 241
  • Notes 252
  • Chapter 15 - J. Hillis Miller 254
  • Introductory Note - Dl 254
  • Notes 262
  • Chapter 16 - HéLène Cixous 263
  • Introductory Note - Dl 263
  • Chapter 17 - Edward Said 271
  • Introductory Note -- Dl/Nw 271
  • Notes 285
  • Chapter 18 - Stanley Fish 287
  • Introductory Note - Dl/Nw 287
  • Notes 306
  • Chapter 19 - Elaine Showalter 307
  • Introductory Note 307
  • Notes [references to 'This Volume' Are to the New Feminist Criticism (1985), Ed. Showalter.] 327
  • Chapter 20 - Paul de Man 331
  • Introductory Note-Dl 331
  • Notes 347
  • Chapter 21 - Fredric Jameson 348
  • Introductory Note - Dl 348
  • Notes 359
  • Chapter 22 - Terry Eagleton 360
  • Introduction Note - Dl/Nw 360
  • Notes 373
  • Chapter 23 - Geoffrey Hartman 374
  • Introductory Note - Dl 374
  • Chapter 24 - Juliet Mitchell 387
  • Introductory Note - Dl 387
  • Chapter 25 - Umberto Eco 393
  • Introductory Note - Dl 393
  • Chapter 26 - Jean Baudrillard 403
  • Introductory Note - Nw 403
  • Notes 411
  • Chapter 27 - Luce Irigaray 413
  • Introductory Note - Nw 413
  • Chapter 28 - Patrocinio P. Schweickart 424
  • Introduction Note - Nw 424
  • Notes 442
  • Chapter 29 - Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick 448
  • Introductory Note - Nw 448
  • Notes 471
  • Chapter 30 - Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak 475
  • Introductory Note - Nw 475
  • Notes 491
  • Chapter 31 - Stephen Greenblatt 494
  • Introductory Note - Nw 494
  • Notes 509
  • Chapter 32 - Jerome Mcgann 512
  • Introductory Note - Nw 512
  • Index 521
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