Tomorrow's Teachers: International and Critical Perspectives on Teacher Education

By Alan G. Scott; John G. Freeman-Moir | Go to book overview

Introduction

Alan Scott and John Freeman-Moir

The aim of this book is to bring together a set of chapters that, individually and collectively, raise the question of teacher education in a critical and thought- provoking way. Those involved in teacher education are acutely aware of how contentious an issue the production of teachers has become. The debate has been held both inside and outside the profession, with academic contributions from those who have spent a lifetime in education or teacher training and political contributions from those for whom teacher education is a very recent issue.

Many of the contributions from politicians and social critics around the world have been hasty and exaggerated, and it is not always clear whether they have a point to make or an axe to grind. What they do, however, is remind us that teacher training is both a social and an educational concern, and that the question of how best to produce teachers is more than just an academic or research exercise.

The first four chapters in the book deal with the political issues involved in teacher education in the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Australia and New Zealand. The contributors were asked to provide a view of teacher education in their own countries that incorporated the political, social and economic influences on the debate over how to train teachers, as opposed to the purely technical/professional issues in the debate.

The remaining eight chapters consider the key issues in teacher education at the end of the twentieth century. In writing their pieces, the authors were asked to bear in mind the following questions. First, what do you take to be the key objectives and outcomes of teacher education? Second, how might a model or a method of teacher education that you envisage meet these objectives? Third, what are the obstacles, difficulties and possibilities in teacher education? In order not to restrict the writers too much, they were invited to write freely and interpret the brief as liberally as they wished.

It is a truism that one of the driving forces behind any society is the necessity for it to reproduce itself across the generations. One generation must hand on to another all the skills, attributes, values, rituals, customs and practices that are perceived as essential for sustaining human life. It is debatable whether this has ever been a simple procedure, even in small tribal settings at the dawn of human evolution, but what is certain is that since the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution this process of handing on 'life' has been complex.

Education, or more precisely formal schooling, whatever the stated objectives of those involved in it, is central to this process of reproduction. Education is about giving the young the skills they will need when they are older. We can, it

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tomorrow's Teachers: International and Critical Perspectives on Teacher Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 220

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.