Tomorrow's Teachers: International and Critical Perspectives on Teacher Education

By Alan G. Scott; John G. Freeman-Moir | Go to book overview

I have considered the implications of these imperatives for the nature and purposes of teacher education. My work has not attempted to challenge these new social practices by pleading for praxis, or reflection, or empowerment or equity or any other of the buzz-words of the 1990s that are by now pretty much exhausted in teacher education discourse. Moreover, little can be achieved by belatedly bleating that we have lost 'the human face' of teaching. There is more to be gained by trying to know intimately the processes we are engaged in, and so bring better questions to bear on the conditions in which we work and live. I do not imagine bringing on the revolution tomorrow, nor do I think of myself as saving teachers or teacher educators from some mythical corporate beast. What I do advocate is that we protect our capacity to think, even though this is difficult at a time when we are compelled by the safety of bland models, stupid optimism, quick techno-fixes or straight thinking.


References

Australian Council of Deans of Education ( 1998) Report of the National Standards and Guidelines for Initial Teacher Education Project. 'Preparing a Profession'. Canberra: ACDE.

Boler M ( 1999) Feeling Power: the fate of emotions in education. London: Routledge.

Bowe R, Ball S and Gold A ( 1992) Reforming education and changing schools: case studies in policy sociology. London: Routledge.

Burke K ( 1997) Designing Professional Portfolios for Change. Sydney: Hawker Brownlow Education.

Castle E B ( 1970) The Teacher. London: Oxford University Press.

Centre for Teaching Excellence ( 1998) Standards for Professional Development and Teaching. [online]. Available: http://www.qed.qld.gov.au/pdt/cte/pdtstan.htm ( 13 May 1998).

Dearing R ( 1997) Higher Education in the Learning Society. ( Report of the National Committee of Enquiry into Higher Education.) London: Department for Education and Employment

Dewhurst D ( 1997) "Education and passion". Educational Theory, 47( 4), 477-87.

Du P Gay ( 1991) "Enterprise culture and the ideology of excellence". New Formations, 13, 45-61.

Ebbeck F (Chair) ( 1990) Teacher Education in Australia: a report to the Australian Education Council by an AEC Working Party. Canberra: National Board of Employment, Education and Training.

Edith Cowan University ( 1996) Gender Issues in Management: enterprising nation--renewing Australia's managers to meet the challenges of the Asia-Pacific Century. Canberra: AGPS.

Felman S ( 1982) "Psychoanalysis and education: teaching terminable and interminable". Yale French Studies, 63, 21-44.

Glasser W ( 1990) The Quality School: managing students without coercion. New York: Harper Perennial.

Goleman D ( 1996) Emotional Intelligence: why it can matter more than IQ. London: Bloomsbury.

Hamilton D and McWilliam E (in press) Ex-centric voices that frame research on teaching. In Richardson V (Ed), Handbook of Research on Teaching (Vol 4). Washington, DC: American Educational Research Association.

Handy C ( 1990) The Age of Unreason. London: Arrow.

Hatcher C ( 1998) The Making of the Enterprising Manager in Australia: a genealogy. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, School of Cultural and Policy Studies, Faculty of Education, Queensland University of Technology.

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