Tomorrow's Teachers: International and Critical Perspectives on Teacher Education

By Alan G. Scott; John G. Freeman-Moir | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

LEN BARTON is Professor of Education at the University of Sheffield. He worked with Geoff Whitty, John Furlong, Sheila Miles and Caroline Whiting on the Modes of Teacher Education Research Project and is co-author with them of Teacher Education in Transition: re-forming professionalism? ( Open University Press, London, 1999).

LANDON E BEYER is Professor and Associate Dean for Teacher Education at Indiana University, Bloomington. His scholarly interests encompass the social and philosophical foundations of education, curriculum theory and development, and alternative approaches to teacher education.

PHILLIP CAPPER has been a Director of the Centre for Research on Work, Education and Business Ltd (WEB Research) since 1994 and is based in Wellington, New Zealand. He now works on research and consultancy projects concerned with organisational learning in New Zealand and overseas. A former secondary teacher, he was also curriculum and assessment officer for the New Zealand Post Primary Teachers' Association.

D JEAN CLANDININ is Professor and Director of the Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development at the University of Alberta. She is a former teacher, counsellor and psychologist. The author or co-author of several books on curriculum, teacher education and teacher knowledge, she was Vice-President of Division B (Curriculum Studies) of the American Educational Research Association. Her latest book, with Michael Connelly, is titled Narrative Inquiry (Jossey-Bass, New York, 1999).

F MICHAEL CONNELLY is the Director of the Centre for Teacher Development, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto, where he teaches in curriculum and teacher development from personal knowledge and narrative theory points of view. He is the co-founder and editor of Curriculum Inquiry and the author or co-author of several books on curriculum, teacher education and teacher knowledge. His latest book, with Jean Clandinin, is titled Narrative Inquiry (Jossey-Bass, New York, 1999).

LINDA MAY FITZGERALD is an assistant professor of curriculum and instruction at the University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, where she helps to prepare early childhood educators. She is a research fellow at the Regents' Center for Early Developmental Education. With faculty colleagues, she is engaged in self-study of teacher education practice. Linda May earned her degrees at the University of Chicago, and spent two years as a post-doctoral fellow in urban education at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

JOHN FURLONG is Professor of Education and Head of the Graduate School of Education, University of Bristol. He worked with Geoff Whitty, Len Barton, Sheila Miles and Caroline Whiting on the Modes of Teacher Education Research Project and is co- author with them of Teacher Education in Transition: re-forming professionalism? ( Open University Press, 1999).

JOCE JESSON is a principal lecturer at the Auckland College of Education, where she lectures in education policy and science education and co-ordinates research development. Her research interests are in education politics, the work of teachers and teacher unionism. She is the education columnist for the New Zealand Political Review. Her work has also been published in a number of books and journals, most recently in Peter Roberts and Mike Peters' Tertiary Education and New Technologies ( Dunmore, 1998).

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