Modern India: The Origins of An Asian Democracy

By Judith M. Brown | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
A Critical Decade: India--Empire or Nation?

Written into the Montagu-Chelmsford Reforms was provision for an inquiry into their operation after ten years: but in 1927 Britain's Tory government appointed a Commission of inquiry under Sir John Simon earlier than scheduled, to keep its composition out of the hands of the less conservative politicians who might replace them at the next General Election. The all- white Simon Commission provoked widespread political protest in India. Its members encountered hostile black-flag demonstrations as they perambulated the country taking evidence in the provinces. The work of the Commission, its reception and its report indicated that British and Indian alike recognized that the imperial bid for a new order on the subcontinent had failed. Although the 1939-45 war is commonly seen as the great upheaval out of which the subcontinent emerged politically independent yet agonizingly divided, the decade until India was engulfed in it was critical for the nature of British dominion, and for the development on the subcontinent of senses of public identity, particularly for a sense of Indian nationhood. The 1930s saw no sudden and dramatic change--in the strength or structure of the raj, in the economic base and social framework of Indian life, or in the daily life and attitudes of India's millions. Yet by 1940 it was clear that the decade had intensified trends and brought decisions crucial in the shaping of modern India. Many of these decisions were the result of drift and default, or of sheer pragmatism. There was never a clear 'point of no return'. But by 1940 the Indian empire was no longer viable in the long term, though it could be kept going in the short term as part of the allied war effort. Furthermore, the potential viability of an Indian nation incorporating British and princely India and the major religious communities was almost as dubious.

Certain themes of long-term significance stand out in the decade. One was a questioning of the legitimacy accorded to different types of authority, particularly that of the imperial government. Closely connected with it was the growth and articulation of public awareness. Those who were once described as the 'real India' for whom the district officer had to speak became vocal and demonstrative on a wide range of public concerns and

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Modern India: The Origins of An Asian Democracy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 464

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.