Slavery and Abolition, 1831-1841

By Albert Bushnell Hart | Go to book overview

INDEX
ABOLITIONISTS, religious phase of movement, 15; and literature, 31, 32; causes, 170- 172; purpose compared with anti-slavery, 173-175; border-state movement, 175- 179; southern leaders in north, 179; Lundy organizes, 180; Garrison as leader, 180, 194, 320; Liberator, 180-183; New England society, 183; national society, 183; its principles, 184; growth, 184; Garrison leaders, 184-187; New England non-Garrisons, 188; in middle states, 189; western, 190-196; Lane Seminary discussion, 190, 191; Oberlin as centre, 191-193; Ohio state society, 193; Birney's Philanthropist, 193; other western societies, 194; diverse sectional development, 194, 196; Chase as political, 195; in Western Reserve, 196; dissensions of eastern, 197-201; question of women agitators, 198; and church disruption, 198; non- political covenant, 200; and other isms, 200; split, 200; effect of split, 201; decay as national moral force, 201, 315; adversaries on motives, 202, 232; character, 203; method of agitation, 203, 232; and gradual emancipation, 204; and slave-holders, 204, 310; knowledge of slavery, 205; and right of discussion, 205, 234, 244, 312, 321; propaganda, 206; typical meeting, 206; publications, 207, 332; negro leaders, 208, 209; English co-operation, 209; Irish address, 210; social ostracism, 210; and eastern colleges, 210; clerical opposition, 211, 212; clerical support, 213; church split on, 213; association with negroes, 215, 315; and amalgamation, 216; incendiary publications, 216; and slave resurrections, 217-221; and fugitives, 221; southern threats against, 235; arrested in south, 235; mobbed there, 235; south demands northern suppression, 236, 237; antagonism with colonization, 239; and difficulties of emancipation, 241; appeals to state governments, 242; and slavery in states, 242; northern agitation against, 242, 243; movement for legislation against, 243, 244; within the law, 244; Massachusetts hearing, 244; attacks on their schools, 244, 245; mobbed in north, 245- 249; reaction, 249; representation in Congress, 250;

-345-

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