CHAPTER 28

HIS mother had written to let Brian know that Merton's collection of prize horseshoes was to be divided among the family, and that she had put one by for when he came back. "You can nail it up on your door as soon as you and Pauline get a council house," she added. The horseshoe again set him thinking of the picture in his grandmother's parlour, of the girl holding a bunch of flowers and saying to the youth by her side: "If you love me as I love you, nothing can ever part us two"--which, pleasurably brooding on his living with Pauline, was how he felt about her. On the last day of his embarkation leave they had walked beyond Strelley Church, lingered between Cossal and Kimberley, wherein one part of the earth had been ripped open, and the humps and hollows they had often made love in while courting were scraped to the grey bones of a lunar landscape. To the left of undiscovered coal was a grey- pencilled wood surrounded by black upturned soil, and scattered beyond, a patrol of trees silhouetted their branches like half- opened fans. From behind came the thud of engines and the sigh of

-421-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Key to the Door
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Part One - Prologue 1
  • Chapter I 3
  • Chapter 2 16
  • Chapter 3 30
  • Part Two - Nimrod 51
  • Chapter 4 53
  • Chapter 5 67
  • Chapter 6 83
  • Chapter 7 96
  • Chapter 8 108
  • Chapter 9 121
  • Chapter 10 132
  • Chapter Ii 142
  • Chapter 12 158
  • Chapter 13 170
  • Chapter 14 179
  • Chapter 15 191
  • Part Three - The Ropewalk 201
  • Chapter 16 203
  • Chapter 17 219
  • Chapter 18 235
  • Chapter 19 252
  • Chapter 20 273
  • Chapter 21 289
  • Chapter 22 308
  • Part Four - The Jungle 321
  • Chapter 23 323
  • Chapter 24 346
  • Chapter 25 364
  • Chapter 26 380
  • Chapter 27 396
  • Chapter 28 421
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 448

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.