Aspirations and Anxieties: New England Workers and the Mechanized Factory System, 1815-1850

By David A. Zonderman | Go to book overview
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Acknowledgements

This book has been many years in the making. During these years, I have received generous assistance from a number of institutions and individuals for my research and writing. Without their support, this book would not have been possible.

A Sullivan Fellowship from the Museum of American Textile History and several graduate student travel grants from the American Studies Program at Yale University supported the research for this project. Salary support from the Research Committee of the Graduate School at the University of Wisconsin - Madison enabled me to devote time to revising the manuscript.

The staffs of the Yale University libraries and the library at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin were always considerate and helpful in assisting me. The following archives and libraries also gave me permission to publish materials in their collections: American Antiquarian Society, Andover ( Mass.) Historical Society, Bailey/Howe Library -- University of Vermont, Baker Library -- Harvard University, Canfield Library ( Arlington, Vt.). Canton ( Conn.) Historical Museum, Connecticut Historical Society, Connecticut State Library-Archives, University of Connecticut Library, Fall River ( Mass.) Historical Society, Lancaster ( Mass.) Town Library, Manchester ( N.H.) Historic Association, Massachusetts State Archives, Museum of American Textile History ( North Andover, Mass.), New Hampshire Historical Society, New Hampshire State Archives, Old Sturbridge Village ( Mass.) Research Library, Rhode Island Historical Society, Schlesinger Library -- Radcliffe College, Sheldon Museum ( Middlebury, Vt.), Slater Mill Historic Site ( Pawtucket, R.I.), State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Stowe-Day Library ( Hartford, Conn.), and Yale University Library.

This book began as a doctoral dissertation in the American Studies Program at Yale University. David Montgomery was my advisor, and his meticulous reading of the original manuscript guided many of my subsequent revisions. David Brion Davis and Alan Trachtenberg also read the dissertation and provided valuable comments. Thomas Dublin, Jonathan Prude, and Sean Wilentz all read the manuscript at various stages in the revision process -- each made rigorous and generous remarks that helped me reshape the project.

-vii-

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