Civic Virtues: Rights, Citizenship, and Republican Liberalism

By Richard Johnson Dagger | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This book began to take shape about seven years ago when Terry Ball and I were hiking the A. B. Young Trail to the rim of Oak Creek Canyon in central Arizona. We were talking shop as we hiked, at least when we had breath enough for talking, and somewhere near the top of the trail Terry suggested that I publish a collection of my essays on citizenship and related topics as a book. He soon persuaded me that this was a good idea. But I eventually came to think that an even better idea would be to use those essays as the basis for a book that would be more than a collection of essays. So I began to examine the essays to see where they would need revision, what new material would need to be written, and how the new and the old could be stitched together into what I hoped would be a seamless whole. Concluding that all of this could be accomplished in a year or two, I set to work on what I came to think of as Civic Virtues.

The path to completion of this book has been much longer than I thought it would be -- and longer by far than the A. B. Young Trail. Other projects intervened and other duties interrupted progress time and again. And much more work was involved in converting a handful of essays into a book than I had anticipated. Others will have to judge how worthwhile that work has been, but I am happy to report, now that the end is near, that the effort of putting my thoughts into order has been personally quite rewarding. Not the least of these rewards has been the opportunity to benefit from the knowledge, critical acumen, and generosity of scholars and friends who have helped me, whether they knew it or not, to write this book. I take great pleasure in thanking them here for their assistance. I take less pleasure in absolving them of any responsibility for the remaining defects of this book, but honesty as well as tradition compel me to shoulder that burden myself.

First among those whose help I am pleased to acknowledge is Terence Ball. From that day in Oak Creek Canyon to the present, Terry's advice and encouragement have sustained my work on this book. I am especially grateful for his chastening comments on the first draft of Civic Virtues.

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Civic Virtues: Rights, Citizenship, and Republican Liberalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 258

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.