The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Opera

By John Warrack; Ewan West | Go to book overview

Q

Quaglio. Italian, later German, family of designers active from the early 18th to the 19th cents. Generally working in pairs, they made an important contribution to the visual aspect of German Romantic opera. Of the six generations, 15 members of the family were active as designers. The most important were:

1. Giulio I or Giovanni Maria III (b Laino, c. 1700; d Vienna, 1765). Designed operas for Vienna, B and K, 1748-65, making considerable use of transparent backdrops, and responding to the reform movement in his designs for Gluck Cinesi ( 1754), Orfeo ( 1762), and Telemaco ( 1765). 2. Lorenzo I (b Laino, 23 July 1730; d Munich, 2 May 1805). Worked in Mannheim and Schwetzingen from 1758, designing works by Salieri, Galuppi, Hasse, and Paisiello. Frankfurt, Dresden 1768-9; designed new Ducal T at Zweibrücken 1775-6, and new Schlosstheater at Mannheim (with Alessandro Bibiena) 1777. Munich from 1778; designed sets for prem. of Idomeneo ( 1781) and for Singspiels by Hiller, Schweitzer, and Holzbauer. His designs are preserved in the T Museum, Munich, and in the Uffizi Gallery, Florence. 3. Giuseppe (b Laino, 2 Dec. 1747; d Munich, 2 Mar. 1828). Second designer Mannheim and Schwetzingen, also worked at Ludwigsburg, Speyer, Frankfurt. Designed Redoutensaal in Mannheim. Munich from 1779: designs include those for Don Giovanni, Magic Flute, Freischütz, developing a more consciously Romantic approach. 4. Angelo II (b Munich, 13 Dec. 1829; d Munich, 5 Jan. 1890). Worked at Munich from 1849, designing Munich prems. of Tannhäuser 1855, Lohengrin 1858, prems. there of Tristan ( 1865), Meistersinger ( 1868), Rheingold ( 1869), Walküre ( 1870), and private productions of Oberon and Gluck Armida for Ludwig II, all revealing a flair for epic architecture. The courtyard at Hohenschwangau is supposedly based on Act 2 of his 1867 MunichLohengrin. Dresden 1865-80; also Prague, St Petersburg. Designs in the Munich T Museum and Ludwig II Museum at Herrenchiemsee.

'qual cor tradisti'. The duet in Act II of Bellini's Norma, in which Norma (sop) reproaches the guilty Pollione (ten) for having betrayed her and now welcomes death with him.

'quand'ero paggio'. Falstaff's (bar) arietta in Act II of Verdi Falstaff, in which he recalls the days when he was a slender young page to the Duke of Norfolk.

'Quando le sere al placido'. Rodolfo's (ten) aria in Act II of Verdi Luisa Miller grieving over the evidence in a letter that his wife Luisa has betrayed him with Wurm.

'quando m'en vo'. Musetta's (sop) aria in Act II of Puccini La boihéme, hoping to recover Marcello's love as they meet in the crowd outside the Café Momus.

'quanto é bellal' Nemorino's (ten) aria in the opening scene of Donizetti L'elisir d'amore, which he sings as he gazes at the beautiful young Adina.

Quatro rusteghi, I (The Four Curmudgeons). Opera in 3 acts by WolfFerrari; text by Sugana and Pizzolato, after Goldoni. Prem. in German as Die vier Grobiane, Munich, N, 19 Mar. 1906.

Venice, end of the 18th cent. Lunardo, Maurizio, Simon, and Cancian (all bs) try to control their wives' excesses, as they see it. Lunardo's daughter Lucieta (sop) is to marry Maurizio's son Filipeto (ten), but custom forbids them even to meet until the wedding. Aided by Riccardo (ten), Filipeto gains entry to Lucieta's house disguised as a girl and the young couple meet, but they are discovered. Cancian's wife Felice (sop) takes a hand, and the old men are persuaded that their best interests lie in permitting the marriage.

queen of Shemakha, The. The Queen (sop) who comes to seduce King Dodon in RimskyKorsakov's The Golden Cockerel.

queen of Spades, The (Russ., Pikovaya dama). Opera in 3 acts by Pyotr Tchaikovsky; text by Modest Tchaikovsky, with suggestions and contributions from the composer, after Pushkin's story ( 1834). Prem. St Petersburg, M, 19 Dec. 1890.

St Petersburg, 1790. Hermann, a young

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The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Opera
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Key to Vocal Compasses x
  • Abbreviations xi
  • A 1
  • B 28
  • C 72
  • D 112
  • E 144
  • F 157
  • G 181
  • H 218
  • I 241
  • J 251
  • K 259
  • L 277
  • M 305
  • N 356
  • O 370
  • P 384
  • Q 419
  • R 421
  • S 449
  • T 505
  • U 525
  • V 529
  • W 545
  • X 563
  • Y 564
  • Z 565
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