The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Opera

By John Warrack; Ewan West | Go to book overview

W

'Wach' auf'. The chorus sung, in Hans Sachs honour in Act III of Wagner's Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. It is a modernization of the beginning of the poem 'Die Wittenbergisch Nachtigall', beginning 'Wach auff! es nahent gen dem tag', with which the historical Sachs greeted Luther and the Reformation.

Waechter, Eberhard (b Vienna, 9 July 1929; d Vienna, 29 Mar. 1992). Austrian baritone. Studied Vienna with Rado. Début Vienna, V (Silvio), 1953. Vienna, S, from 1954; London, CG, 1956, 1959; Bayreuth, 1958-9, 1962-3, 1966; New York, M, 1961. Also Gly.; Paris, O; Salzburg. A polished and versatile artist with a dark, seductive tone, successful as Don Giovanni, Mozart's Almaviva, Escamillo, Flying Dutchman, Wolfram, Amfortas, Orestes. Created III (Einem, Der Besuch der alten Dame). Intendant Vienna, V, 1986-92; S, 1991-2. (R)

Waffenschmied, Der (The Armourer). Opera in 3 acts by Lortzing; text by composer, after Ziegler Liebhaber und Nebenbuhler in einer Person ( 1790). Prem. Vienna, W, 30 May 1846.

Worms, 16th cent. The Count of Liebenau (bar) has fallen in love with Marie (sop), daughter of the armourer Stadinger (bs). He woos her in both his own person and as an apprentice smith, Conrad. When she tells the Count that she loves Conrad, he is triumphant, until rejected in both guises by Stadinger, who wants her to marry the Count's servant Georg (ten). When he refuses, Marie is given to Conrad, and all is revealed.

Wagenseil, Georg Christoph (b Vienna, 29 Jan. 1715; d Vienna, 1 Mar. 1777). Austrian composer. Active at the Viennese court from 1735, he composed c.13 dramatic works, including pasticcios, mostly for court festivities, the earliest of which was Ariodante ( 1745). In such works as La demenza di Tito ( 1746) and Vincislao ( 1750) he began to turn Viennese court opera away from the ponderous Baroque model of his teacher Fux towards something lighter and more graceful, reflecting above all the influence of the new 'style galant'.

Wagner, Cosima (b Bellaggio, 24 Dec. 1837; d Bayreuth, 1 Apr. 1930). Daughter of Liszt; married first Hans von Bülow ( 1857), then Wagner ( 1870), with whom she worked to establish Bayreuth. She was in charge of the festival 1883-1906, and responsible for the productions; in these, her aim was to ensure that Wagner's instructions continued to be followed, and she cultivated in the theatre and at Wahnfried a reverential attitude to Wagner that came to hinder the flow of new ideas which was also at the centre of his work. She rejected Appia, for instance, with the argument that Wagner's wishes were already completely known. However, while assuming a priestess role, she did make changes, with the assertion of her personal knowledge of Wagner's wishes. Accounts of her rehearsing suggest painstaking attention to detail, particularly of gesture and verbal inflection. She attempted to restrict Parsifal to Bayreuth, in accordance with Wagner's wish, and was unforgiving of artists who performed it elsewhere. Her diaries give a devoted, reverential, but not unobservant account of her life with Wagner; and there are glimpses in them of a character shyer and more vulnerable than the grande dame manner she later cultivated.

Wagner Johanna. (b Lohnde, 13 Oct. 1826; d Würzburg, 16 Oct. 1894). German soprano. Adopted daughter of Wagner's brother Albert ( 1799-1874), tenor and producer. Début Dresden 1844 (Agathe). Created Elisabeth ( Tannhäuser). Then studied Paris with Viardot. Hamburg 1849; Berlin, H, 1850-61; London, HM, 1856. Schwertleite and First Norn in first Ring. Roles included Tancredi, Lucrezia Borgia, Fidès, Ortrud. Possessed an 'incomparably beautiful' voice ( Wagner) and charming stage personality. But Wagner, who had hoped her to be his 'representative' (and indeed the first Brünnhilde), came to complain of her essentially vain and selfseeking nature.

Wagner, Richard (b Leipzig, 22 May 1813; d Venice, 13 Feb. 1883). German composer. Wagner's early interests were primarily dramatic, and his early musical studies were casual and frequently disrupted. His main

-545-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Opera
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Key to Vocal Compasses x
  • Abbreviations xi
  • A 1
  • B 28
  • C 72
  • D 112
  • E 144
  • F 157
  • G 181
  • H 218
  • I 241
  • J 251
  • K 259
  • L 277
  • M 305
  • N 356
  • O 370
  • P 384
  • Q 419
  • R 421
  • S 449
  • T 505
  • U 525
  • V 529
  • W 545
  • X 563
  • Y 564
  • Z 565
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 571

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.