Narratives of Early Pennsylvania, West New Jersey and Delaware, 1630-1707

By Albert Cook Myers | Go to book overview
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NOTE

THE first of the illustrations in this volume is a facsimile of a portion of an excellent map entitled "Novi Belgii Novoeque Angliæ necnon Pennsylvaniæ et Partis Virginiæ Tabula," by N. J. Visscher, a prominent Dutch map-engraver of the middle of the seventeenth century. The whole map embraces, as the title implies, all those parts of New England, the Middle States, and Maryland which at that time had been settled by white men or had become known, more or less accurately, through their explorations. The whole map measures twenty-two by nineteen inches. The part which has been selected for reproduction in this volume covers the regions especially involved in the narratives printed therein. The map is chosen as representing the state of things at the time when Swedish occupation of the Delaware River region gave way to Dutch. Its date cannot be later than June 28, 1656, since a copy of it accompanied a report of that date from the directors of the Dutch West India Company to the States General of the United Netherlands. On the other hand it can hardly have been finished before February, 1655, since in that month the directors of the West India Company authorized the publication of the first edition of Adriaen van der Donck's Beschrijvinge van Niew Nederlant, which has no map, while the second edition, published in 1656, has a map copied partly from Visscher's. I am informed by Mr. Wilberforce Eames of the New York Public Library, to whom I am indebted for much information respecting the map, that, though the map was formerly reputed exceedingly rare, there are probably now in this country a dozen or twenty copies of it in this form. Twenty-eight years later Visscher's son published a reissue of the map from a plate retouched with the addition of Philadelphia and other places and names belonging to subsequent history.

The second illustration in the volume is a reproduction of Thomas Holme's "Portraiture of the City of Philadelphia". Thomas Holme

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Narratives of Early Pennsylvania, West New Jersey and Delaware, 1630-1707
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