Narratives of Early Pennsylvania, West New Jersey and Delaware, 1630-1707

By Albert Cook Myers | Go to book overview

disapproved of. Karakung1 [had] the watermill,2 which the Governor had built for the people, which was the first in the country. Chamassung,3 also called Finland, a district where the Finns dwelt by the waterside, and Neaman's Kihl,4 one and a quarter miles from Christina. Manathaan,5 or Cooper's Island, was an island below Fort Christina, so called by a cooper, who dwelt there with two Hollanders, and made casks, or wooden vessels and small boats. Techoherassi6 -- Olof Stillé's place -- Gripsholm,7 Nya Wasa,8 etc., which are marked upon the oldest maps, were places laid out and planned, but did not get established under the Swedish administration.9


11. To what Land the Swedes had a Right, partly by Purchase and partly by Agreement.

The land on the west side of the river, which the Swedes had purchased of the heathen, already in Menewe's time, and afterwards under Governor Printz, or had acquired a right to by agreement, stretched from Cape Hinlopen to the Falls of the Delaware, and thence westward to the Great Fall in the river Susquehanna, near the mouth of the Conewaga Creek.10

____________________
1
Karakong, now Cobbs Creek.
10
It is doubtful if the Swedes purchased land from the Indians thus far from the Delaware. The Great Falls of Susquehanna River or Conewago Falls are a manifestation of the river's cleavage of the South Mountain range, the southeastern wall of the Great Valley of Pennsylvania and Virginia. They begin on a line directly opposite the mouth of Conewago Creek, the boundary between
2
Mölndal, or the Swedes mill, on the Karakong Kill, or present Cobbs Creek, was erected in 1645 and was the first water mill within the limits of Pennsylvania or Delaware. Its site may still be seen at the rocks on the east bank of the stream near the Blue Bell Inn on the road from Philadelphia to Darby.
3
Chammassungh or Finland, where the Finns dwelt, was on the west side of the Delaware River, between the present Marcus Hook in Pennsylvania and the mouth of Naaman's Creek just over the circular state line in Delaware.
4
Now Naaman's Creek; about eight English miles from Christina.
5
Now called Cherry Island Marsh, but no longer an island.
6
On the Delaware at the north side of the present Ridley Creek, now Eddy. stone Borough.
7
Thought to be a corruption of Korsholm (Fort Nya Korsholm); it first appears on Visscher's (a Dutch) map of about 1655.
8
On Minquas Kill or Kingsessing Creek, a western affluent of the Schuylkill near the mouth of the river.
9
These places were established by the Swedes.

-69-

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