Is America Necessary? Conservative, Liberal, & Socialist Perspectives of United States Political Institutions

By Henry Etzkowitz; Peter Schwab | Go to book overview

rightly insisting that we try to make life at the workplace more challenging, less degrading, more meaningful. That is something that all of us should subscribe to and support.


Liberal

Eileen Whalen. Working women.

More and more women are leaving the house at 8 a.m. and coming back at 6 p.m., five days a week. They're riding the buses and subways or getting a lift from a neighbor to go to the office or the plant. Though more and more hours are spent by women at their jobs away from home, there is an attitude among employers and many of us that those jobs are not their real work and need not be taken seriously.

Today's average woman has had her last child before she's thirty. So by the time she is thirty-six her children are either in school or on their own. At this age she often thinks of going back to work.

Marital status of women workers(Approx.)
Married (husband present)60%
Single20%
Divorced, separated, or widowed20%
1920: Average age: 28; usually single factory
worker or clerk
1970: Average age 39; usually married, in
variety of occupations

If a woman with children works, her average work life will be twenty-five years. The woman who never marries works an average of forty years.

The greatest recent increase in women workers has been among young married women. This increase is probably due to the recession which brought on inflation and unsteady employment for many husbands. About one out of three women with children under six is working, usually part-time. There also has been an increase in young wives who work full-time, putting off having children. With male teachers and engineers losing their jobs, even middle-class wives increasingly have no choice but to go to work.


Why do women work?

Are young women just passing the time waiting for a husband and children? Do married women want extra money for clothes and luxuries, or are they just bored with staying at home? These are the explanations most frequently given in the magazines. These explanations are myths which are profitable for employers. For women, they only reinforce work conditions where women have low wages and status, boring and repetitive work, with little training and promotion whether working three or thirty years.

By far the main reason women work is to keep their heads above water economically. Approximately 75 percent of the families where the wife works would have an inadequate income if she didn't work.

In two out of four families, the wife's working brings the income up to $7,000. For a family of four that means having better meat on the table and being able to buy more than one winter coat a year per family. For the third family, the wife's working brings the income up to $9,000. For that family it means having some choice in housing and going to a private doctor rather than a crowded clinic. In the fourth family, the husband's salary is adequate and the wife may work because she wants to.

Single, divorced, separated, and widowed women are supporting themselves and often their children. Ninety percent of divorced women work.


Wives working

Working wives sometimes create conflicts while easing others. Tensions and frustra

-519-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Is America Necessary? Conservative, Liberal, & Socialist Perspectives of United States Political Institutions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 658

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.