CHAPTER III
FAMILY INFLUENCES

IN EMBRACING, as he did at the beginning, the patriot cause, Madison was unhampered by any regrets that might have come from a living family connection with England. His second cousin James went to England a few years before the Revolution to be ordained as a priest, the voyage being necessary, because Virginia was under the spiritual jurisdiction of the Bishop of London and had no bishop of her own. He did not remain long, and formed no strong English ties. He was the only member of the family who received any part of his education outside of the colonies. England was not, therefore, home to the Madisons as it was to so many other American families. They were purely a colonial family, almost coeval with the Anglo-Saxon settlement of the New World, and the record did not extend beyond that.

" CaptainIsaac Maddyson," an artisan, one of the colonists of 1623, and mentioned in John Smith's history as a good Indian-fighter, was the first Madison to reach the New World.*. A hundred years later, November 15, 1723, his descendant, Ambrose Madison, in conjunction

____________________
*
Mr. Gay in his "Life of Madison," denies that Isaac Madison was an ancestor of the Virginia Madisons, but Mr. Rives, whose source of information was the family tradition, asserts that he was
John Madison, ship carpenter, patented lands in 1653 in Gloucester County; his son John was sheriff of King and Queen County in 1704; his son was Ambrose, who married Frances Taylor, August 24, 1721, Zachary Taylor, President of the United States, being her collateral descendant. Ambrose Madison's third child, Frances, great-aunt of James Madison, Jr., married Jacob Hite, who was killed by the Indians, July, 1776. James Madison and Eleanor Conway had the following issue: James, born March 16, 1751, died June 28, 1836; Frances, born June 18, 1753; Ambrose, born January 27, 1755, died October--, 1793, Catlett, born February 10, 1758, died March 8, 1758; Nelly Conway, born February 4, 1760, married Isaac Hite, January 2, 1783; William, born May 5, 1762, married Fanny Throckmorton, died July 20, 1843; Sarah, born August 27, 1764, married Thomas Macon; Elizabeth, born February 9, 1768, died May 17, 1775; Reuben, born September 9, 1771, died June--, 1775; Frances Taylor, born October 4, 1774, married Robert Rose, died October--, 1823. "William and Mary Quarterly," IX, 39. Family Bible record of Major Isaac Hite and of the Willis family of Orange.

-19-

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