CHAPTER XXIV
THE NATIONAL GAZETTE

THE principal newspaper organ of the Anti-Federalists until Jefferson left the Cabinet was The National Gazette edited by Philip Freneau and established largely at Madison's instigation. The chief Federalist organ was The United States Gazette with John Fenno for editor. Fenno's prospectus when he moved his paper from New York to Philadelphia in the autumn of 1790 said:

"At this important crisis, the ideas that fill the mind, are pregnant with events of the greatest magnitude--to strengthen and complete the union of the States--to extend and protect their commerce--to explore and arrange the national funds--to restore and establish the public credit--will require the energies of the patriots and sages of our country."

*

Freneau announced his purpose:

"In this paper the Editor engages to support, as far as a newspaper can with propriety be supposed to support, the great principles upon which the American Revolution was founded, a faithful adherence to which can alone preserve the blessings of liberty to this extensive empire --an empire, in which the grand experiment is now making, whether or not the assertion of certain European philosophers be true, that a pure republic can never subsist for any length of time, except in a very limited extent of territory."

Hamilton himself sometimes attacked the Anti-Federalists over a pseudonym through Fenno's columns, and Madison wrote a number of unsigned articles for Freneau, but they were all short philosophical or political dis

____________________
*
The National Gazette, November 3, 1790.

-235-

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