CHAPTER XXV
DOLLY PAYNE

IT IS not strange that the East and South should have so frequently found themselves in opposition on public questions, for their industries, products, climate and traditions were different. Moreover, the leaders of thought in either section had little personal knowledge of the other section, and more of them had been to Europe than had travelled extensively in their own country. The prejudice of the East against the South and of the South against the East was thus based partly upon ignorance.

"A human life, I think," says George Eliot, "should be well rooted in some spot of a native land, where it may get the love of tender kinship for the face of earth." Such a kinship existed for Americans of the time of which we are writing to an extraordinary degree, for they were nearly all countrymen. It existed especially for the Virginians, whose family associations tied them to their plantations. There their fathers had lived, and there they expected their sons to live. They constituted a landed aristocracy, a privileged order which governed the State.

Fine types of the class were Jefferson, Madison and Monroe, the two former with splendid inherited farms of baronial extent, and Monroe bending his energies to the establishment of a similar estate. It was after the parties formed in Congress and Jefferson became the leader of the Republicans, that the three Virginians made a league and became the three musqueteers of American public life. Henceforth they acted together on all questions and guarded each other's interests with perfect

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