CHAPTER XXXV
THE RETIRED STATESMAN

HAVING seen Monroe take the oath of office, March 4, 1817, Madison departed for Montpelier, never again to hold Federal office. He continued the example set by his predecessors in the presidency, and preserved the dignity of his retirement carefully, keeping entirely aloof from participation in political affairs, and refusing to lend his influence in favour of any man's candidacy for office. Soon after he returned to Montpelier he had printed a form of letter, which he sent to office-seekers who solicited his recommendation.*It stated that his personal relations with the President were such that he would not embarrass him by asking favours, and that he had determined to refuse to recommend any appointments.

When the wave of Jackson enthusiasm was at its height he resisted a concerted effort to extract from him some assistance to the party opposed to Jackson. It was confidently believed that he was in sympathy with that party, and the anti-Jackson convention at Richmond determined to put him at the head of its list of nominations of presidential electors, Monroe being also named. James Barbour, formerly Governor of Virginia, and a number of others importuned him to accept, Barbour declaring that by doing so he would decide the election,but he would not yield; and when he and Monroe were nominated in spite of their refusal, they declined positively to serve. With Jackson's conduct of the presidential office he had no sympathy, and he did not conceal the fact from his

____________________
*
"Early Office Seeking,"--N. Y. Evening Post, Nov. 26, 1898.
Dept. of State MSS.

-364-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life of James Madison
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 404

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.