America's Renewable Resources: Historical Trends and Current Challenges

By Kenneth D. Frederick; Roger A. Sedjo | Go to book overview

ESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE

DIRECTORS
Lawrence E. Fouraker, John H. Gibbons Thomas E. Lovejoy
Chairman Robert H. Haveman Laurence I. Moss
John M. Deutch Bohdan Hawrylyshyn Isabel V. Sawhill
Henry L. Diamond Donald M. Kerr Barbara S. Uehling
James R. Ellis Thomas J. Klutznick Macauley Whiting
Robert W. Fri Frederic D. Krupp Mason Willrich
Darius W. Gaskins, Jr. Henry R. Linden

HONORARY DIRECTORS

Hugh L. Keenleyside, Edward S. Mason, John W Vanderwilt


OFFICERS

Robert W. Fri, President

Paul R. Portney, Vice President

Edward F. Hand, Secretary-Treasurer

RESOURCES FOR THE FUTURE (RFF) is an independent nonprofit organization that advances research and public education in the development, conservation, and use of natural resources and in the quality of the environment. Established in 1952 with the cooperation of the Ford Foundation, it is supported by an endowment and by grants from foundations, government agencies, corporations, and individuals. Grants are accepted on the condition that RFF is solely responsible for the conduct of its research and the dissemination of its work to the public. The organization does not perform proprietary research.

RFF research is primarily social scientific, especially economic. It is concerned with the relationship of people to the natural environmental resources of land, water, and air; with the products and services derived from these basic resources; and with the effects of production and consumption on environmental quality and on human health and well-being. Grouped into four units--the Energy and Natural Resources Division, the Quality of the Environment Division, the National Center for Food and Agricultural Policy, and the Center for Risk Management--staff members pursue a wide variety of interests, including forest economics, natural gas policy, multiple use of public lands, mineral economics, air and water pollution, energy and national security, hazardous wastes, the economics of outer space, climate resources, and quantitative risk assessment. Resident staff members conduct most of the organization's work; a few others carry out research elsewhere under grants from RFF.

Resources for the Future takes responsibility for the selection of subjects for study and for the appointment of fellows, as well as for their freedom of inquiry. The views of RFF staff members and the interpretation and conclusions of RFF publications should not be attributed to Resources for the Future, its directors, or its officers. As an organization, RFF does not take positions on laws, policies, or events, nor does it lobby.

-v-

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America's Renewable Resources: Historical Trends and Current Challenges
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Esources for the Future v
  • Contents vii
  • Tables x
  • Figures xi
  • Preface xiii
  • 1: Overview: Renewable Resource Trends 1
  • References 21
  • 2: Water Resources: Increasing Demand and Scarce Supplies 23
  • Notes 71
  • Appendix 2 72
  • References 75
  • 3: Forest Resources: Resilient and Serviceable 81
  • Notes 115
  • Appendix 116
  • References 118
  • 4: Rangeland Resources: Changing Uses and Productivity 123
  • Notes 161
  • Appendix 4 162
  • References 163
  • 5: Cropland and Soils: Past Performance and Policy Challenges 169
  • References 203
  • 6: Wildlife: Severe Decline and Partial Recovery 205
  • Notes 241
  • Appendix 6 242
  • References 245
  • 7: The Growing Role of Outdoor Recreation 249
  • Notes 279
  • Appendix 280
  • References 281
  • About the Authors 283
  • Photo Credits 284
  • Index 285
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