Writings and Speeches of Eugene V. Debs

By Eugene V. Debs | Go to book overview

opposite of Horace Greeley, and as small as he was great, will be our knee-breeched, official flunkey at the crowning of the king.

Of course it would not be consistent for our President to drop a crumb of comfort to the Boers.

Let it not be understood that I have the slightest feeling against Henry of Prussia; it is the prince I have no use for. Personally, he may be a good fellow, and I am inclined to believe he is, and if he were in trouble and I had it in my power to help he would find in me a friend. The amputation of his title would relieve him of his royal affliction and elevate him to the dignity of a man.

This is a necessary part of the mission of Socialism, and the revolutionary movement is sweeping over the United States as well as Germany.

It means the end of princes, the end of paupers and the beginning of Man.

"To ears attuned, the victor's shouts
Are crossing o'er the sea:
Resounding like Jove's thunder peals
The working clan are free."


ROOSEVELTS LABOR LETTERS1

The letter of President Roosevelt to the Moyer and Haywood conference of New York is in strange contrast with the one previously addressed by him to the Chicago conference on the same subject. The two letters are so entirely dissimilar in spirit and temper that they seem to have been written by different persons. In the first the President bristles with defiance, in the last he is the pink of politeness.

The first letter utterly failed of its purpose. Organized labor did not lie down and be still at the command of the President. On the contrary, it growled more fiercely than before; in fact, showed its teeth to the President, who has become so used to exhibiting his own. And lo--what a change! The President receives a labor committee, talks over matters for an hour and then addresses a letter to the conference through the chairman, beginning "My Dear Mr. Henry," explaining that he is ready to perform his duty if only the conference will point it out to him, and putting the whole blame on " Debs and the Socialists," whom he charges with using "treasonable and murderous language." but not a word of explanation does

____________________
1
Appeal to Reason, May 18, 1907.

-274-

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