Writings and Speeches of Eugene V. Debs

By Eugene V. Debs | Go to book overview

are so profoundly concerned about your "patriotism" and your "religion" and who receive their thirty pieces for warning you against Socialism because it will endanger your morality and interfere with your salvation.


RULING CLASS ROBBERS1

Three hundred and twenty million dollars a year, or about a million dollars a day, is the amount stolen by the ruling class robbers of the capitalist system from the treasury of the United States.

How is this shameless raid on the national treasury committed? Easy enough. Most of the rich (!) men in this, as in every other country, are perjurers and thieves and if the law of their own making were enforced they would all be keeping the lockstep with the other thieves and felons in the penitentiary.

The plutocrats and their lesser breed ought to pay four hundred million dollars in income tax annually into the treasury of the United States. They actually pay but eighty million dollars of that amount. The difference, three hundred and twenty million dollars, is stolen by these rich robbers from the American people every year.

Basil M. Manly, the expert government investigator, after six months of thorough investigation, has brought this robbery to light and supported it by an array of unimpeachable facts and figures. His exposé of the rich tax-dodgers, perjurers and thieves is complete and ought to be read by every honest man in the land. The report is entitled "The United States Income Tax Steal" and is published under the direction of the Newspaper Enterprise Association, under whose direction the investigation was conducted, which has uncovered and laid bare this colossal robbery of the public treasury.

Since the gigantic steal has been exposed, Secretary McAdoo, Secretary of the Treasury, has been explaining that there is no adequate provision for enforcing the law and that therefore the tax can not be collected, nor the eminently respectable tax-dodging perjurers and thieves brought to justice. Exactly! But did any poor pilferer of a penny's worth of stale bread to allay his hunger pangs

____________________
1
American Socialist, July 1, 1916.

-399-

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