The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune

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THE LIFE OF HORACE GREELEY.

CHAPTER I.
THE SCOTCH-IRISH OF NEW HAMPSHIRE.

Londonderry in Ireland--The Siege--Emigration to New England--Settlement of Londonderry, New Hampshire--The Scotch-Irish introduce the culture of the potato and the manufacture of linen--Character of the Scotch-Irish-Their simplicity--Love of fan--Stories of the early clergymen--Traits in the Scotch. Irish character--Zeal of the Londonderians in the Revolution--Horace Greeley's allusion to his Scotch-Irish ancestry.

NEW HAMPSHIRE, the native State of Horace Greeley, was settled in part by colonists from Massachusetts and Connecticut, and in part by emigrants from the north of Ireland. The latter were called Scotch-Irish, for a reason which a glance at their history will show.

Ulster, the most northern of the four provinces of Ireland, has been, during the last two hundred and fifty years, superior to the rest in wealth and civilization. The cause of its superiority is known. About the year 1612, when James I. was king, there was a rebellion of the Catholics in the north of Ireland. Upon its suppression, Ulster, embracing the six northern counties, and containing half a million acres of land, fell to the king by the attainder of the rebels. Under royal encouragement and furtherance, a company was formed in London for the purpose of planting colonies in that fertile province, which lay waste from the ravages of the recent war. The land was divided into shares, the largest of which did not exceed two thousand acres. Colonists were invited over from England and Scotland. The natives were expelled from their fastnesses in the hills, and forced to settle upon the plains. Some

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