The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune

By J. Parton | Go to book overview

hearted in this matter, don't stop to contradict or confute him, but press on his attention the main question respecting the honesty of these crooked charges. It is with these the public is concerned, and not this or that man's motives. Calling me a hypocrite or demagogue cannot make a charge of $1,664 for coming to Congress from Illinois and going back again an honest one."


CHAPTER XXIV.
ASSOCIATION IN THE TRIBUNE OFFICE.

Accessions to the corps--The course of the Tribune--Horace Greeley In Ohio--The Rochester knockings--The mediums at Mr. Greeley's house--Jenny Lind goes to see them--Her behavior--Woman's Rights Convention--The Tribune Association --The hireling system.

BUT the Tribune held on its strong, triumphant way. Circulation, ever on the increase; advertisements, from twenty to twenty- six columns daily; supplements, three, four, and five times a week; price increased to a shilling a week without loss of subscribers; Europeon reputation extending; correspondence more and more able and various; editorials more and more elaborate and telling; new ink infused into the Tribune's swelling veins. What with the supplements and the thickness of the paper, the volumes of 1849 and 1850 are of dimensions most huge. We must look through them, notwithstanding, turning over the broad black leaves swiftly, pausing seldom, lingering never.

The letter R. attached to the literary notices apprises us that early in 1849, Mr. George Ripley began to lend the Tribune the aid of his various learning and considerate pen. Bayard Taylor, returned from viewing Europe a-foot, is now one of the Tribune corps, and this year he goes to California, and 'opens up' the land of gold to the view of all the world, by writing a series of letters, graphic and glowing. Mr. Dana comes home and resumes his place in the office as manager-general and second-in-command. During

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