Chapter XIII
THE OTHER WAR

When we beat plouthshares into swords, we should exchange also three other P's for S's: profit for service, party for State, procrastination for speed.

Article on "A New Spirit for Total War," in The Times, March 17, 1942.

T HE title of this chapter marks two general distinctions. The Other War, from the end of May 1940, is different from the Phoney War that preceded it. The Other War, from the end of May 1940, is different from the war going on at the same time which has been described by Mr. Churchill. Practically none of the experiences recorded or the problems considered in this chapter is mentioned in the text of any of his volumes; they appear at highest in brief minutes in some of the Appendices.1 Yet these experiences and problems are as much a part of total war as is the clash of armed men in battle, or the discussions and manæuvres of their leaders in council.

The title of this chapter marks also a distinction personal to myself between 1914-18 and 1939-45. In the earlier war I was in the Government machine, near the centre of two of its major developments for total war -- the Ministry of Munitions and the Ministry of Food; as a civil servant I never expressed my own views in public. In the later war I was in the Government machine only for a few months at a time for special jobs. I was the last of the Old Dogs to be taken into use and I was never absorbed as the others were. I remained for most of World War II a voice outside the Government, expressing personal views by letters and articles in The Times and elsewhere, by broadcasts, in books, and finally in the House of Commons.

There was a difference also in the source of my income. In World War I, I was a civil servant paid by the Government. In World War II, I was Master of an Oxford College; the principle which we laid down on the outbreak of war that members and staff of the College should neither gain nor lose by service to the country in war applied to me as to others.

____________________
1
Thus my Report on Skilled Men in the Services is the subject of two minutes in Vol. III, Appendix G, and my Report on Social Insurance appears in two minutes of VoL IV, Appendix F, of The Second World War.

-273-

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