The Life of Horace Greeley, Editor of the New York Tribune

By J. Parton | Go to book overview

for adjacent towns made up. Again there is a lull in the activity of the Tribune building, and, sleepily, we bend our steps homeward.

There is something extremely pleasing in the spectacle afforded by a large number of strong men co-operating in cheerful activity, by which they at once secure their own career, and render an important service to the public. Such a spectacle the Tribune building presents. At present men show to best advantage when they are at work; we have not yet learned to sport with grace and unmixed benefit; and still farther are we from that stage of development where work and play become one. But the Tribune building is a very cheerful place. No one is oppressed or degraded; and, by the minute subdivision of labor in all departments, there is seldom any occasion for hurry or excessive exertion. The distinctions which there exist between one man and another, are not artificial, but natural and necessary; foreman and editor, office-boy and head clerk, if they converse together at all, converse as friends and equals; and the posts of honor are posts of honor, only because they are posts of difficulty. In a word, the republicanism of the Continent has come to a focus at the corner of Nassau and Spruce- streets. There it has its nearest approach to practical realization; thence proceeds its strongest expression.


CHAPTER IXIX.
POSITION AND INFLUENCE OF HORACE GREELEY.

At the head or his Profession--Extent of his Influence--Nature of his Induence--A Conservative-Radical -- His Practical Suggestions--To Aspiring Young Men -- Have a Home of your own--To Young Mechanics--Coming to the City--A Labor Exchange--Pay as you go--To the Lovers of Knowledge--To Young Orators--The Colored People--To young Lawyers and Doctors--To an inquiring Slaveholder-- To Country Editors--In Peace, prepare for War--To Country Merchants--Tenement Houses.

A SATIRIST observes, that the difference, in modern days, between a distinguished and a common man is, that the name of a distin

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