The Trust Problem in the United States

By Eliot Jones | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII 1
THE UNITED SHOE MACHINERY COMPANY

Practically all of the shoes now made in this country are manufactured by machinery. In 1915 there were over 1,500 manufacturers of shoes scattered throughout the country, producing annually in the aggregate more than 300,000,000 pairs of machine- made shoes. A very important group of these machines is that used to prepare and attach the soles to the uppers,--a process known in the trade as bottoming. The more important of the bottoming machines, without which factory shoes can not profitably be made, are the lasting machines, the welt-sewing machines, the outsole-stitching machines, the heeling machines, and the metallic-fastening machines.2 By the year 1899, through a process of combination, there had developed a dominating concern in the manufacture of each one of these groups of machines. The Consolidated and McKay Lasting Machine Company under letters patent manufactured 60 per cent of the lasting machines made in this country; the Goodyear Shoe Machinery Company produced 80 per cent of the outsole-stitching machines, and 10 per cent of the lasting machines; and the McKay Shoe Machinery Company made 70 per cent of the heeling machines, and 80 per cent of the metallic-fastening machines.3

____________________
1
On the United Shoe Machinery Company see: Original Petition in United States v. United Shoe Machinery Company in the district court of the United States for the eastern district of Missouri; Brief for the United States in United States v. United Shoe Machinery Company (no. 207); 227 U. S. 202-218; 222 Fed. Rep. 349-415; 247 U. S. 32-91; 264 Fed. Rep. 138-175; Report of the Senate Committee on Interstate Commerce on the Control of Corporations, 1913; Hearings on Trust Legislation held before the House Committee on the Judiciary, 1913- 1914; Roe, Journal of Political Economy, 21, pp. 938-953, and 22, pp. 43-63.
2
For a description of these machines and of the process of shoe manufacture, see Brief for the United States (no. 207), pp. 7-15.
3

See 227 U. S. 215. Mr. Winslow, president of the United Shoe Machin

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