The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

assembled for that purpose, these twelve shall, on the signal of a handkerchief, be suddenly laid low. My two hundred Germans will have surrounded the senate-house. At that moment I enter, and claim homage as the Duke. (Rings the bell.)

LOMEL. And what of Andreas?

GIANET. (contemptuously). He is an old man. (Enter a servant.) If the Duke should ask for me, say I am gone to mass. (Exit servant.) I must conceal the devil that's within beneath a saintly garb.

LOMEL. But, my lord, the paper?

GIANET. Take it, and let it be circulated among our party. This letter must be dispatched by express to Levanto. 'Tis to inform Spinola of our intended plan, and bid him reach the capital early in the morning. (Going.)

LONEL. Stop, Prince. There is an error in our calculation. Fiesco does not attend the senate.

GIANET. (looking back). Genoa will easily supply one more assassin. I'll see to that. [Exeunt different ways.


SCENE IV.--An Antichamber in FIESCO'S Palace.

FIESCO, with papers before him, and MOOR.

FIESCO. Four galleys have entered the harbour, dost thou say?

MOOR. Yes, they're at anchor in the port

FIESCO. That's well. Whence are these expresses?

MOOR. From Rome, Placentia, and France.

FIESCO (opens the letters, and runs over them). Welcome! Welcome news! (In high spirits.) Let the messengers be treated in a princely manner.

MOOR. Hem! (Going.)

FIESCO. Stop, stop! Here's work for thee in plenty.

MOOR. Command me. I am ready to act the setter or the blood-hound.

FIESCO. I only want at present the voice of the decoybird. To-morrow, early, two thousand men will enter the city in disguise, to engage in my service. Distribute thy assistants at the gates, and let them keep a watchful eye upon the strangers that arrive. Some will be dressed like pilgrims on their journey to Loretto, others like mendicant friars, or Savoyards, or

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