The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

loud and commanding tone.) Go! Thy work is a mere juggle. Let the semblance give place to reality! (With haughtiness, overturning the picture.) I HAVE DONE what thou--hast only painted. (All struck with astonishment; ROMANOcarries away, the picture in confusion.)


SCENE XVIII.
The former, except ROMANO.

FIESCO. Did you suppose the lion slept, because he ceased to roar? Did your vain thoughts persuade you that none but you could feel the chains of Genoa? That none but you durst break them? Before you knew their weight, Fiesco had already broken them. (He opens a scrutoire, takes out a parcel of letters, and throws them on the table.) These bring soldiers from Parma;--these, French money;--these, four galleys from the Pope. What, now, is wanting to rouse the tyrant in his lair? Tell me, what think you wanting? (All stand silent with astonishment.) Republicans! you waste your time in curses, when you should overturn the tyrant. (All but VERRINA throw themselves at FIESCO'S feet.)

VERRINA Fiesco, my spirit bends to thine, but my knee cannot. Thy soul is great; but--Rise, Genoese! (They rise.)

FIESCO. All Genoa was indignant at the effeminate Fiesco; all Genoa cursed the profligate Fiesco. Genoese! my amours have blinded the cunning despot. My wild excesses served to guard my plans from the danger of an imprudent confidence. Concealed beneath the cloak of luxury, the infant plot grew up. Enough--I'm known sufficiently to Genoa in being known to you. I have attained my utmost wish.

BOURG. (throwing himself indignantly into a chair). Am I, then, nothing?

FIESCO. But let us turn from thought to action. All the engines are prepared--I can storm the city by sea and land. Rome, France, and Parma cover me; the nobles are disaf fected; the hearts of the populace are mine; I have lulled to sleep the tyrants; the state is ripe for revolution. We are no longer in the hands of Fortune. Nothing is wanting.-- Verrina is lost in thought.

BOURG. Patience! I have a word to say, which will more quickly rouse him than the trumpet of the last day. (To

-180-

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