The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

by Fiesco. My heart beats higher. All Genoa is roused; the very mercenaries follow his name with transport--and shall his wife be fearful? (Alarm-bells sound from three other towers.) No--my hero shall embrace a heroine. My Brutus clasp within his arms a Roman wife. I'll be his Portia. (Putting on GIANETTINO's hat, and throwing his scarlet mantle round her.)

ARABELLA. My gracious lady, how wildly do you rave! (Alarm bells and drums are heard.)

LEONORA. Cold-blooded wretch; canst thou see and hear all this, and yet not rave? The very stones are ready to weep that they have not feet to run and join Fiesco--These palaces upbraid the builder, who laid their foundations so firmly in the earth, that they cannot fly to join Fiesco-- The very shores, were they able, would forsake their office in order to follow his glorious banner, though by so doing they abandoned Genoa to the mercy of the ocean--What might shake death himself out of his leaden sleep, has not power to rouse thy courage? Away!--I'll find my way alone-----

ARABELLA. Great God! You will not act thus madly?

LEONORA (with heroic haughtiness). Weak girl! I will. (With great animation.) Where the tumult rages the most fiercely--Where Fiesco himself leads on the combat--Me thinks I hear them ask, "Is that Lavagna, the unconquered hero, who with his sword decides the fate of Genoa? Is that Lavagna?"--Yes, I will say; yes, Genoese, that is Lavagna: and that Lavagna is my husband!

Sacco (entering with CONSPIRATORS). Who goes there?-- Doria or Fiesco?

LEONORA (with enthusiasm). Fiesco and liberty! (Retires into another street--A tumult, ARABELLA lost in the crowd.)


SCENE VI.
SACCO, with a number of followers. CALCAGNO, meeting him with others.

CALCAGNO. Andreas has escaped.

SACCO. Unwelcome tidings to Fiesco.

CALCAGNO. Those Germans fight like furies! They planted themselves around the old man like rocks: I could not even get a glimpse of him Nine of our men are done for; I myself was

-220-

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