The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

LOVE AND INTRIGUE.
A TRAGEDY.

DRAMATIS PERSONÆ.
PRESIDENT VON WALTEER, Prime Minister in the Court of a German Prince.
FERDINAND, his son; a Major in the Army; in low with Louisa Miller.
BARON VON KALB, Court Marshal (or Chamberlain).
WORM, Private Secretary to the President.
MILLER, the Town Musician, and Teacher of Music.
MRS. MILLER, his wife.
LOUISA, the daughter of Miller, in love with Ferdinand.
LADY MILFORD, the Prince's Mistress.
SOPHY, attendant on Lady Milford.
An old Valet in the service of the Prince.
Officers, Attendants, &c.

ACT I.

SCENE I.
MILLER--MRS. MILLER.

MILLER (walking quickly up and down the room). Once for all! The affair is becoming serious. My daughter and the baron will soon be the town-talk--my house lose its character --the president will get wind of it, and--the short and long of the matter is, I'll show the younker the door.

MRS. MILL. You did not entice him to your house--did not thrust your daughter upon him!

MILL. Didn't entice him to my house--didn't thrust the girl upon him! Who'll believe me?--I was master of my own house. I ought to have taken more care of my daughter I should have bundled the major out at once, or have gone straight to his excellency, his papa, and disclosed all.--The

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