The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

her affectionately.) This arm shall support my Louisa through life. Fairer than it dismissed thee, shall Heaven receive thee back, and confess with delight that love alone can give perfection to the soul.

LOUISA (disengaging herself from him, greatly agitated). No more! I beseech thee! Ferdinand! no more! Couldst thou know--Oh! leave me, leave me!--Little dost thou feel how these hopes rend my heart in pieces like fiends! (Going.)

FERD. (detaining her). Stay, Louisa! stay! Why this agitation?--Why those anxious looks?

LOUISA. I had forgotten these dreams, and was happy. Now--now--from this day is the tranquillity of my heart no more. Wild impetuous wishes will torment my bosom! Go! God forgive thee! Thou hast hurled a fire-band into my young peaceful heart, which nothing, nothing can extinguish! (She breaks from him, and rushes from the apartment, followed by FERDINAND.)


SCENE V.--A Chamber in the PRESIDENT'S House.

The PRESIDENT, with the grand order of the cross about his neck, and a star at his breast--SECRETARY WORM

PRESIDENT. A serious attachment, say you? No, no, Worm; that I never can believe.

WORM. If your excellency pleases, I will bring proofs of my assertions.

PRES. That he has a fancy for the wench--flatters her --and, if you will, pretends to love her--all this is very possible,--nay--excusable--but--And the daughter of a musi cian, you say?

WORM. Of Miller, the music--master.

PRES. Handsome?--But that of course.

WORM (with warmth). A most captivating and lovely blondine, who, without saying too much, might figure advantageously beside the greatest beauties of the court.

PRES. (laughs). It's very plain, Worm, that you have an eye upon the jade yourself--I see that. But listen, Worm. --That my son has a passion for the fair sex gives me hope that he will find favour with the ladies. He may make his way at court. The girl is handsome, you say--I am glad to think my son has taste. Can he deceive the silly wench

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