The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

shall procure you a lodging in prison.--(To his servants).--

Call in the officers of justice!--Away! (Some of the attendants go out.--The PRESIDENT paces the stage with a furious air.) The father shall to prison; the mother and her strumpet daughter, to the pillory!--Justice shall lend her sword to my rage! For this insult will I have ample amends.--Shall such contemptible creatures thwart my plans, and set father and son against each other with impunity?--Tremble, miscreants! I will glut my hate in your destruction--the whole brood of you--father, mother, and daughter, shall be sacrificed to my vengeance!

FERD. (to MILLER, in a collected and firm manner). Oh! not so!-----Fear not, friends! I am your protector. (Turning to the PRESIDENT, with deference)--Be not so rash, father! For your own sake let me beg of you, no violence.--There is a corner of my heart where the name of father has never yet been heard.--Oh! press not into that!

PRES. Silence, unworthy boy! Rouse not my anger to greater fury!

MILLER (recovering from a stupor). Wife, look to your daughter! I fly to the duke.--His highness' tailor--God be praised for reminding me of it at this moment--learns the flute of me--I cannot fail of success. (Is hastening off.)

PRES. To the duke, will you?--Have you forgotten that I am the threshold over which you must pass, or failing, perish? --To the duke, you fool!--Try to reach him with your lamentations, when, reduced to a living skeleton, you lie buried in a dungeon five fathoms deep, where light and sound never enter; where darkness goggles at hell with gloating eyes!--

There gnash thy teeth in anguish; there rattle thy chains in despair, and groan, "Woe is me! This is beyond human endurance!"


SCENE VII.
Officers of Justice--the former.

FERD. (flies to LOUISA, who, overcome with fear, faints in his arms). Louisa!-----Help, for God's sake! Terror overpowers her!

[ MILLER, catching up his cane, and putting on his hat, prepares for defence.--MRS. MILLERthrows herself on her knees before the PRESIDENT.]

-274-

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