The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

the strings, dashes the instrument upon the ground, and, stamping it to pieces, bursts into a load laugh.) -----Walter!-- God in Heaven! What mean you?--Be not thus unmanned! This hour requires fortitude;--it is the hour of SEPARATION!--You have a heart, dear Walter: I know that heart--warm as life is your love--boundless and immeasurable--bestow it on one more noble, more worthy--she need not envy the most fortunate of her sex!--(Striving to repress her tears.) You shall see me no more!--Leave the vain disappointed girl to bewail her sorrow in sad and lonely seclusion: where her tears will flow unheeded.--Dead and gone are all my hopes of happiness in this world--yet still shall I inhale ever and anon the perfumes of the faded wreath! (Giving him her trembling hand, while her face is turned away.) Baron Walter-----farewell!

FERD. (recovering from the stupor in which he was plunged). Louisa! I fly! Do you indeed refuse to follow me?

LOUISA (who has retreated to the further end of the apartment, conceals her countenance with her hands). My duty bids me stay, and suffer.

FERD. Serpent! thou liest--some other motive chains thee here!

LOUISA (in a tone of the most heartfelt sorrow). Encourage that belief--Haply it may make our parting more support able.

FERD. What? Oppose freezing duty to fiery love!--And dost thou think to cheat me with that delusion?--Some rival detains thee here, and woe be to thee and him should my suspicions be confirmed! [Exit.


SCENE V.

LOUISA (she remains for some time motionless in the seat upon which she had thrown herself. At length she rises, comes forward and looks timidly round). Where can my parents be?--My father promised to return in a few minutes; yet full five dreadful hours have passed since his departure--Should any accident-----Good Heavens! What is come over me?--Why does my heart palpitate so violently!

-287-

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