The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

I done? What sentiments have I betrayed? To whom have I betrayed them?--Oh, Louisa, noble, great, divine soul, for give the ravings of a maniac!--Fear not, my child!--I will not injure a hair of thy head!--Name thy wishes!--Ask what thou wilt!--I will serve thee with all my power;--I will be thy friend--thy sister!--Thou art poor;--look (taking off her brilliants), I will sell these jewels--sell my wardrobe-- my carriages and horses--all shall be thine--grant me but Ferdinand!

LOUISA (draws back, indignantly). Does she mock my despair?--or is she really innocent of participation in that cruel deed?--Ha! then, I may yet assume the heroine, and make my surrender of him pass for a sacrifice! (Remains for a while absorbed in thought, then approaches LADY MILIFORD. seizes her hand, and gazes on her with a fixed and significant look.) Take him, lady!--I here voluntarily resign the man whom hellish arts have torn from my bleeding bosom!----- Perchance you know it not, my lady! but you have destroyed the paradise of two lovers: you have torn asunder two hearts which God had linked together; you have crushed a creature not less dear to him than yourself, and no less created for happiness; one by whom he was worshipped as sincerely as by you; but who, henceforth, will worship him no more!-- But the Almighty is ever open to receive the last groan of the trampled worm.--He will not look on with indifference, when creatures in his keeping are murdered.--Now Ferdinand is yours.--Take him, lady, take him!--Rush into his arms!-- Drag him with you to the altar!--But forget not that the spectre of a suicide will rush between you and the bridal kiss. --God be merciful!--No choice is left me! (Rushes out of the chamber.)


SCENE VIII.

[LADY MILFORD alone, in extreme agitation, gazing on the door
by which
LOUISA left. At length she recovers from her
stupor
.

LADY M. What was that?--What preys so on my heart! --What said the Unhappy one?--Still, O Heaven, the dreadful, damning words ring in my ears!--"Take him!--Take him!"--What should I take, Unfortunate? The bequest of you:

-307-

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