The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

quest! It shall be my last. My brain burns with fever!-- I need refreshment!--Will you make me some lemonade?

[Exit LOUISA.


SCENE III.

FERDINAND and MILLER.

They both pace up and down, without speaking, on opposite sides of the room, for some minutes.

MILL. (standing still at length, and regarding the MAJOR with a sorrowful air). Dear Baron, perhaps it may alleviate your distress to say that I feel for you most deeply.--

FERD. Enough of this, Miller. (Silence again for some moments.) Miller, I forget what first brought me to your house.--What was the occasion of it?

MILL. How, Baron? Don't you remember? You came to take lessons on the flute.

FERD. (suddenly). And I beheld his daughter!--(Another pause.)--You have not kept your faith with me, friend! You were to provide me with repose for my leisure hours; but you betrayed me, and sold me scorpions. (Observing MILLER'S agitation.) Tremble not, good old man!--(falling deeply affected on his neck)--the fault was none of thine!

MILL. (wiping his eyes). Heaven knows, it was not!

FERD. (traversing the room, plunged in the most gloomy meditation). Strange! Oh! beyond conception strange, are the Almighty's dealings with us!--How often do terrific weights hang upon slender, almost invisible threads!--Did man but know that he should eat death in a particular apple! --Hem!--Could he but know that!--(He walks a few more turns; then stops suddenly, and grasps MILLER's hand with strong emotion.)--Friend, I have paid dearly for thy lessons --and thou, too, hast been no gainer--perhaps mayst even lose thy all.--(Quitting him dejectedly.) Unhappy flute-playing, would that it had never entered my brain!-----

MILL. (striving to repress his feelings). The lemonade is long in coming. I will inquire after it, if you will excuse me.

FERD. No hurry, dear Miller! (Muttering to himself.) At least to her father there is none.--Stay here a moment--

-320-

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