The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

What was I about to ask you?--Ay, I remember! Is Louisa your only daughter? Have you no other child?

MILL. (warmly). I have no other, Baron!--and I wish for no other. That child is my only solace in this world, and on her have I embarked my whole stock of affection.

FERD. (much agitated). Ha!--Pray see for the drink, good Miller!

[Exit MILLER.


SCENE IV.
FERDINAND alone.

FERD. His only child!--Dost thou feel that, murderer? His only one!--Murderer, didst thou hear, his only one?-- The man has nothing in God's wide world but his instrument and that only daughter!--And wilt thou rob him of her?

Rob him?--Rob a beggar of his last pittance?--Break the lame man's crutch, and cast the fragments at his feet?--How? Have I the heart to do this?--And when he hastens home, impatient to reckon in his daughter's smiles the whole sum of his happiness; and when he enters the chamber, and there lies the rose--withered--dead--crushed--his last, his only, his sustaining hope.--Ha! And when he stands before her, and all nature looks on in breathless horror, while his vacant eye wanders hopelessly through the gloom of futurity, and seeks God, but finds him no where, and then returns disappointed and despairing!--Great God! and has not my father, too, an only son?--an only child,--but not his only treasure. --(After a pause.) Yet stay! What will the old man lose? She who could wantonly jest with the most sacred feelings of love, will she make a father happy?--She cannot! She will not! And I deserve thanks for crushing this viper ere the parent feels its sting.


SCENE V.
MILLER returning, and FERDINAND.

MILL. You shall be served instantly, Baron! The poor thing is sitting without, weeping as though her heart would break! Your drink will be mingled with her tears.

FERD. 'Twere well for her were it only with tears! Wo

-321-

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