The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

that I sent you--I shall be here when you return.--You will wait for an answer.

LOUISA (very anxiously). Cannot I be the bearer of your message?

FERD. (to MILLER, who is going). Stay--one thing more I Here is a letter to my father, which I received this evening inclosed in one to myself.--Perhaps on business of importance. --You may as well deliver it at the same time.

MILL. (going). Very well, baron!

LOUISA (stopping him, and speaking in a tone of the most exquisite terror). But, dear father, I could do all this very well! Pray let me go!

MILL. It is night, my child! and you must not venture out alone! [Exit.

FERD. Light your father down, Louisa. (LOUISA takes a candle and follows MILLER. FERDINAND in the meantime approaches the table, and throws poison into the lemonade). Yes! she must die! The Higher Powers look down, and nod their terrible assent. The vengeance of Heaven subscribes to my decree. Her good angels forsake her, and leave her to her fate!


SCENE VII.
FERDINAND and LOUISA.

Louisa re-enters slowly with the light, places it on the table, and stops on the opposite side of the room, her eyes fixed on the ground, except when she raises them to him with timid stolen glances. He stands opposite, looking stedfastly on the earth--a long and deep silence.

LOUISA. If you will accompany me, Baron von Walter, I will try a piece on the harpsichord! (She opens the instrument. FERDINAND makes no answer.--A pause.)

LOUISA. You owe me a revenge at chess. Will you play a game with me, Baron von Walter?--(Another pause.)

LOUISA. I have begun the pocket-book, baron, which I promised to embroider for you.--Will you look at the design? --(Still a pause).

LOUISA. Oh! I am very wretched!

FERD. (without changing his attitude). That may well be

-325-

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