The Works of Frederick Schiller, Early Dramas and Romances: The Robbers, Fiesco, Love and Intrigue, Demetrius, the Ghost-Seer, and the Sport of Destiny

By Henry G. Bohn; Friedrich Schiller | Go to book overview

DEMETRIUS.

ACT I.

SCENE I.

THE DIET AT CRACOW.

On the rising of the curtain, the Polish Diet is discovered, seated in the great Senate Hall. On a raised platform, elvated by three steps, and surmounted by a canopy, is the imperial throne; the escutcheons of Polandand Lithuania suspended on each side. The KING seated upon the throne; on his right and left hand his ten royal officers standing on the platform. Below the platform the BISHOPS, PALATINES, and CASTELLANS seated on each side of the stage. Opposite to these stand the Provincial DEPUTIES, in a double line, uncovered. All armed. The ARCHBISHOP OF GNESEN, as the Primate of the kingdom, is seated next the Proscenium; his Chaplain behind him, bearing a golden cross.

ARCHBISHOP OF GNESEN.

Thus, then, hath this tempestuous Diet been
Conducted safely to a prosperous close;
And king and commons part as cordial friends.
The nobles have consented to disarm,
And straight disband the dangerous Rocoss*;
Whilst our good king his sacred word has pledged,
That every just complaint shall have redress.

* * * * *

And now that all is peace at home, we may
Look to the things that claim our care abroad.

* * * * *

Is it the will of the most High Estates,
That Prince Demetrius, who hath advanced
A claim to Russia's crown, as Ivan's son,
Should at their bar appear, and in the face
Of this august assembly prove his right?

____________________
*
An insurrectionary muster of the nobles.

-333b-

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