Joseph Conrad: A Critical Biography

By Jocelyn Baines | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IX
THE PARTNERSHIP

ONCE Lord Jim was out of the way, the Conrad family went off to Bruges, towards the end of July, 'to join the disconsolate and much enduring Hueffer'1 with the idea of combining a holiday with some collaboration on Seraphina. From Bruges the whole party moved to Knocke, on the coast near Ostend. Here Borys got dysentery and nearly died:

The whole hotel was in a commotion: Dutch, Belgians and French prowled about the corridor on the look-out for news. Women with babies of their own offered to sit up, and a painter of religious subjects, Paulus by name, rose up and declared himself ready to do likewise. Elsie Hueffer helped a bit, but poor H. did not get much collaboration out of me this time.2

It is not surprising that Jessie described the holiday as a 'night- marish time'.3 The episode gave rise to almost the only good words that Jessie had to say for Hueffer: 'At this crisis I have nothing but praise for F. M. H. He earned my gratitude and appreciation by the manner he showed his practical sympathy. He was always at hand to shift my small invalid, fetch the doctor or help with the nursing.'4

After this disastrous month abroad the Conrads returned to the Pent, and during the rest of the year Conrad worked at his collaboration on Seraphina. He also, probably in September,5 started another story of his own, Typhoon, which he finished in January of the new year, 1901.6

In the Author's Note Conrad says that he had heard the incident on which Typhoon is based--the taking of a ship with a large number of coolies on board through the centre of a typhoon--'being talked about in the East'. He adds that 'I never met anybody personally concerned in this affair'. The hero, Captain MacWhirr, 'is not an acquaintance of a few hours, or a few weeks, or a few months. He is

-256-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Joseph Conrad: A Critical Biography
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 510

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.