The Psalms, Tr. and Interpreted in the Light of Hebrew Life and Worship

By Elmer A. Leslie | Go to book overview

Chapter V
HYMNS OF THE REVELATION OF GOD

THE PSALMS COME FLAMINGLY FROM THE SOUL OF AN EXPERIENCING PEOPLE. THE ancient Israelites were uniquely gifted in the capacity to feel. And in no aspect of their life is this quality so evident or so rich in contribution to humanity as in the lyrical expression of their religious experience.

The psalmists found God most of all in the world within, that inner realm of immediate awareness wherein they felt themselves confronted by an Other, searching, comprehending, condemning, rebuking, challenging, and comforting. But they also found Him in the world without. In physical nature they saw His glory. In their national history they felt His presence. In their law they heard His voice.

In the present section we are concerned only with the first of these realms of the outer world in which the psalmist found God, and more especially with those psalms which have the best right to be called hymns of nature. They are Pss. 8; 19:1-6; 29; 104; 147; 148.


1. HYMNS OF THE REVELATION OF GOD IN NATURE

Ps. 8. THE SYMPHONY OF THE HEAVENS

Ps. 8 is a hymn of the night. The psalmist has an awed appreciation of what every nature lover in Palestine felt, the living beauty of an Oriental night. There is a universal quality in the psalm, for there are no national limits to the God whose glory fills heaven and earth. And when the psalmist deals with "man" as he does in verse 4, it is not man as Israelite that he has in mind, but man as man, a universal.

The most distinctive thing in this psalm is the revelation of God in nature, and it is this which determines its classification. At the same time it heightens the importance of the psalm when we note that it has a most appropriate worship setting in the Festival of Tabernacles. This is implied by its central theme, the creation of the world. The Festival of Tabernacles, with which Israel's New Year coincides, is the festival of the renewal of creation. The psalm, like Ps. 134, is a vigil liturgy,1 appropriate for a night service in connection with that festival par excellence of Israel. Just such a night service in the Temple, participated in by the pilgrims to the Festival of Tabernacles2 with gladness of heart, is described in the book of Isaiah:

Ye shall have a song in the night
As when a holy feast is observed. (30:29.)

____________________
1
cf. also Quell, op. cit., p. 78; Josephus Contra Apionem I. 22.
2
Vs. 30, which describes the storm-bringing winter rains, implies that it is Tabernacles.

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psalms, Tr. and Interpreted in the Light of Hebrew Life and Worship
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.