The Psalms, Tr. and Interpreted in the Light of Hebrew Life and Worship

By Elmer A. Leslie | Go to book overview

Chapter X PRAYERS OF THE FALSELY ACCUSED

ONE OF THE PERSISTENT PROBLEMS OF SOCIETY IS FOR AN ACCUSED MAN AND AN accuser to secure justice. This is one of the gravest issues of our time and becomes more complex and more difficult of solution as society develops. Ancient Israel early developed a simple system designed for the securing of justice. The Elohist's story of Moses, which is the most psychologically brilliant and most adequate of all the early traditions of which Moses is the center, sets the beginnings of it at Kadesh. Moses is pictured as sitting to judge the people from morning until evening. When a matter of dispute arises among the people whom he has led as far as the wilderness, the parties concerned come to Moses, who judges between man and man and informs them of the divine laws. Jethro, Moses' father-in-law, seeing how wearing this is both upon the long waiting line of people and upon Moses, encourages him to appoint able and responsible men who cannot be bribed and organize them in a system of judicial administration. Moses places officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens, who will at set times judge the ordinary matters, but those that cannot so easily be settled, the difficult disputes, are to be brought to him. In such cases he is to be the mediator of the divine decision. Says Jethro:

Be thou for the people to Godward,
And bring thou the causes unto God. ( Exod. 18:19.)

Driver is right in maintaining that there is here a kernel of historicity which sets us at the beginnings of those precedents which are the origins of Israelite law. And it is clearly understood that some cases can be settled only by some one who is recognized as mediating the incisive truth and judgment of God.

The Deuteronomic law recognizes this same distinction. In the historical introduction to the Deuteronomic Code it is stated that when a dispute is too difficult for the appointed judges, the matter must be brought unto God: "The cause that is too hard for you, ye shall bring unto me, and I will hear it" (1:17b), that is, it shall be brought to the sanctuary, which in the Deuteronomist's thought was the Jerusalem Temple.

The Code of the Covenant, which was probably contemporary with Solomon in date, provides that in any trespass against another's property where the placing of the guilt is uncertain, the cause of both accuser and accused shall come before God, and he whom God condemns must make double restitution ( Exod. 22:9). This means that the decision must be made and the sentence given at the sanctuary with the presiding priest acting as judge.

The fact that such matters were to be decided and judgment given at the Temple is implied in the prayer of the dedication of the Temple by King Solo

-315-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psalms, Tr. and Interpreted in the Light of Hebrew Life and Worship
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 450

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.