Problems of American Economic Growth

By Bruce R. Morris | Go to book overview
problem of control in order that the efforts of individuals will be directed toward accepted goals, preferably those of the majority of the. people as is presumed in a democratic society. What combination of controls is most conducive to such goals, including the objective of as much freedom for the individual as is possible, is a major concern of our society. This involves encouraging the values which are most conducive to growth, unless other values are recognized as being more important than growth. In this country cultural and value influences do not seriously interfere with growth. Only the possibility of discrimination and the increasing fear of non-conformity seem threats to our continued growth.A major concern is the relative roles to be played by government and private enterprise. More and more it is becoming recognized that the government has a responsibility for promoting values that tend to be lost in a system of laissez-faire individualism. Ideally government should be kept as small as is consistent with the values we want to see achieved and as large a place as possible should be assigned to individual effort and private enterprise.Once the role of government is decided, the methods it uses must be determined. In general, these should be indirect and general rather than direct and specific. Its activities should be coordinated and directed toward preconceived goals.Other economic institutions can aid or hinder growth and thus are important to growth. A few of the more important questions in this respect are: whether the growth of big business is consistent with efficiency and growth; what the role and power of unions and other interest groups should be; how to secure proper functioning of credit facilities so as to provide the necessary credit while avoiding too rapidly rising or falling prices; what proper tax policy is for growth and other objectives; and what proportion of the national income should be taken by the government for collective wants.
Bibliography
Jewkes J. "Monopoly and Economic Progress," Economica, Aug. 1953, pp. 197-214.
Phelps E. H. Brown, and J. A. Ozga. "Economic Growth and the Price Level," Economic Journal, March 1955, pp. 1-18.

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Problems of American Economic Growth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 3
  • Chapter Two - The American Record 19
  • Chapter Three - The Supply of Raw Materials 39
  • Chapter Four - Population and the Supply of Workers 59
  • Chapter Five - The Supply of Capital 84
  • Chapter Six - Technological Change And Entrepreneurship 111
  • Chapter Seven - Consumer Demands 137
  • Chapter Eight - Government Expenditure 158
  • Chapter Nine - Relations with Other Economies 179
  • Chapter Ten - Problem of Balanced Growth 217
  • Bibliography 256
  • Chapter Twelve - Summary and Conclusions 257
  • Appendix A 262
  • Bibliography 266
  • Index 267
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