José Martí, Cuban Patriot

By Richard Butler Gray | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
POLITICAL IDEAS

ALTHOUGH JOSÉ MARTÍ touched upon many philosophical and sociological topics in his writings, his major interest and dedication, when he was not brooding about his personal griefs and torturing his sensibilities to the breaking point, was in politics.

In about an hour and a half one can easily run through the two- volume index to Quesada y Miranda Obras completas de Martí, and find references to many of the major political theorists of the Westent world. By no stretch of charity, however, can Martí be considered to have thought out a consistent political theory. He had little time for closet philosophy in the matter of politics. He was, first and last, from his revolutionary tract Patria libre to the Manifiesto de Montecristi, an active revolutionist. Yet in the course of fulfilling this self-appointed mission in life he had occasion to include in his letters, newspaper articles, poetry, drama, and notes novel observations about political theory, public administration, comparative government, legislation, civil rights, law, economics, and through it all, a belief in a humanistic philosophy. Martí had an insatiable curiosity that led him to many insights into the practical workings of politics, which he seemed to prefer to the study of organized theory.

These references are to be found mainly in Martí's sixteen volumes on "North Americans and North American Scenes," his four volumes on "European Scenes," and in his three volumes of notes. Volumes I through IX of his collected works, which deal with Cuban politics and the: Revolution, represent letters, documents, and newspaper articles largely from Patria, and contain many of Martí's ideas about politics, but they generally do not include abstract political philosophy.

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
José Martí, Cuban Patriot
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 307

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.