Life and Letters of Joel Barlow, LL.D., Poet, Statesman, Philosopher: With Extracts from His Works and Hitherto Unpublished Poems

By Charles Burr Todd | Go to book overview

JOEL BARLOW.

CHAPTER I.
1754-1778.

IN Fairfield County, in south-western Connecticut, near the New York border, lies the quiet rural town of Redding, -- a town founded by one of the most distinguished jurists of the Massachusetts Colony -- John Read -- and settled by the choicest of that "sifted wheat" for which, to the sowing of New England, three kingdoms were winnowed. The place is rich in all that could fashion or stimulate poetic fancy.

It is situated on the lower slope of the beautiful hillcountry of Connecticut. Its salient features are three great parallel ridges running north and south and separated by deep valleys, the channels of watercourses. Westward, the tumbled masses of the Taghkanics, hill beyond hill, rise from the deep valley of the Saugatuck. In summer, all the accessories of the pastoral -- green fields, furrowed hills, thick wood, deep glen, and foaming cascades-were to be found here; nor were historic scenes and points of interest wanting to lend them dignity. On the westernmost of these ridges, barely eight miles from the granite pillar separating New York from Connecticut, in a long-roofed farmhouse, Joel Barlow was born. The Barlows were what is known in Connecticut as "good stock," that is, they were respectable landholders, paid their tithes promptly, and gave no one occasion to speak

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Life and Letters of Joel Barlow, LL.D., Poet, Statesman, Philosopher: With Extracts from His Works and Hitherto Unpublished Poems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Introductory Note. iii
  • Joel Barlow. 1
  • Chapter II - 1778-1780. 10
  • Chapter III - 1780-1783. 24
  • Chapter IV - 1783-1788. 46
  • Chapter V - 1788-1795. 55
  • Chapter VI - 1795-1797. 115
  • Chapter VII - 1797-1805. 151
  • Chapter VIII - 1805-1811. 204
  • Chapter IX - 1811-1813. 256
  • Chapter X - Personal. 289
  • Index. 305
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