Life and Letters of Joel Barlow, LL.D., Poet, Statesman, Philosopher: With Extracts from His Works and Hitherto Unpublished Poems

By Charles Burr Todd | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.
1795-1797.

RETURNING to Paris from a business trip to the Low Countries in the surnmer of 1795, Barlow found awaiting him there his old friend and companion-in-arms, Col. David Humphreys. This gentleman, whom we last saw in Hartford, had in the eight years which had elapsed also much advanced his fortunes. Joining Washington at Mt. Vernon in 1787, he had remained in his family until 1790, when he was appointed by Washington Minister to Portugal, with general supervision over Barbary affairs. Algerine piracy was then at its height of insolence and ferocity. The little bundle of wretched despotisms on the southern shore of the Mediterranean dominated all Christendom. Great Britain, France, Spain, Holland, Denmark, Sweden, and Venice paid them tribute; Algiers alone was now waging successful war with Russia, Austria, Portugal, Naples, Sardinia, Genoa, and Malta. Her first depredation against American commerce was committed on the 25th of July, 1785, when the schooner Maria, Captain Stevens, owned by Mr. Foster, of Boston, was seized off Cape St. Vincent by a corsair and carried into Algiers. Five days later the ship Dolphin, Captain O'Brien, Messrs. Irvine, of Phila. delphia, owners, was taken one hundred and fifty miles to the westward of Lisbon. Other captures followed, so that by 1795 there were fully one hundred and fifty American prisoners in the slave-pens of Algiers. These slaves, as appears from their own depositions, were treated with the utmost rigor and cruelty. The most promising were selected by the Dey for menial service in his palace; the others were dismissed to a life of grind

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Life and Letters of Joel Barlow, LL.D., Poet, Statesman, Philosopher: With Extracts from His Works and Hitherto Unpublished Poems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Introductory Note. iii
  • Joel Barlow. 1
  • Chapter II - 1778-1780. 10
  • Chapter III - 1780-1783. 24
  • Chapter IV - 1783-1788. 46
  • Chapter V - 1788-1795. 55
  • Chapter VI - 1795-1797. 115
  • Chapter VII - 1797-1805. 151
  • Chapter VIII - 1805-1811. 204
  • Chapter IX - 1811-1813. 256
  • Chapter X - Personal. 289
  • Index. 305
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