Life and Letters of Joel Barlow, LL.D., Poet, Statesman, Philosopher: With Extracts from His Works and Hitherto Unpublished Poems

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INDEX.
A.
Adams, John, on Barlow's letter, 161.
Advice to the Privileged Orders, 89.
Algiers, description of, 121.
Algerine piracies, 115.
André, Major, execution of, 35.
Anarchiad, the, 51.

B.
Barlow, Joel, birth and parentage, 1-3; early days, 4-7; graduates at Yale College, 7-8; chaplain in Continental army, 28; marriage, 30; writes the Vision of Columbus, 39; visits Philadelphia, 42; leaves army and settles at Hartford, 46; founds the American Mercury and studies law, 46; admitted to bar at Fairfield, 47; revises Dr. Watts' version of Psalms, 48; and helps with the Anarchiad, 51; publishes the Vision of Columbus, 53; agent abroad of the Scioto Land Company, 63; arrives in Europe, 68; begins his mission in Paris, 68; received by Jefferson, 70; sends a company of emigrants to America, 70; failure of the Scioto Company, 72-3; diary in France, 73; in England, 75; journey through France, 81-2; settles in Paris, life there, 85-8; removes to London and writes Conspiracy of Kings and Address to the Privileged Orders, 89; returns to Paris, 92; in London again, 93; sets out to join Lafayette at Metz, 94; fails, and returns to London, 96; made citizen of France, 97; goes to Savoy and writes Hasty-Pudding, 98-9; the poem, 99-108; returns to Paris, 110; joined by his wife, 111; American correspondents, 111; European, 112; accepts mission to Algiers, 117 letters from, 119-148; return to Paris, 151; translates Volney's "Ruins," 152; writes a letter to Washington, 156; comments on it of John Adams and the Boston Centinel, 161-3; Barlow's reply, 166; its effect, 174; aids Fulton with the steamboat, 177-203; returns to America, 204; reception, 204-8; advocates a National University, 208-9; publishes the Columbiad, 213; settles at Kalorama, 215; critics attack the Columbiad, 218; reply to Abbé Gregoire's strictures on, 221; civic honors, 234; estimate of Thomas Paine, 236; Jefferson's letters to, 240; Noah Webster's, 244; letters to his nephew, Thomas Barlow, 252; appointed Ambassador to France, 256; instructions of Monroe, 258; delays at court, 269; Napoleon appoints a conference at Wilna, 270; Barlow sets out, 273; letters describing the journey, 274-7; arrives at Wilna, 277; fails to meet the Emperor, 279; return, sufferings, and death by the way, 280-2; his death, how received at home, 284; in France, 286; bibliography and personal details, 289.
Baldwin, Abraham, tutor, 4; chaplain, 22; urges chaplaincy on Barlow, 24; advises concerning the poem, 25; and the chaplaincy, 28; visits Barlow, 39; takes attorney's oath, 45; senator, 63; death, 211.
Baldwin, Ruth, parentage, 5; engaged to Joel Barlow, 6; Barlow's letters to, 21; marriage, 30 joins her husband in Paris, 92; letter to Mrs. Dr. Dwight, 92-93; to Mrs. Madison, 273; on her husband's death, 285; Barlow's verses to, 292; death, 287.
Buckminster, Joseph, tutor, 4; letters to Barlow, 9, 10.

C.
Carey, Matthew, printer, 3.
Columbiad published, 213,
Conspiracy of Kings, 89.

-305-

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