Mark Twain: A Biography: The Personal and Literary Life of Samuel Langhorne Clemens - Vol. 1

By Albert Bigelow Paine | Go to book overview

MARK TWAIN A BIOGRAPHY
THE PERSONEL AND LITERARY LIFE OF SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS

BY ALBERT BIGELOW PAINE

WITH LETTERS, COMMENTS AND INCIDENTAL WRITINGS HITHERTO UNPUBLISHED; ALSO NEW EPISODES, ANECDOTES, ETC.

THREE VOLUMES FULLY ILLUSTRATED

VOLUME 1

HARPER & BROTHERES PUBLISHERS NEW YORK AND LONDON MCMXII

-iii-

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Mark Twain: A Biography: The Personal and Literary Life of Samuel Langhorne Clemens - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Prefatory Note *
  • Title Page iii
  • An Acknowledgment vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xiii
  • Prefatory Note xv
  • I - Ancestors 1
  • II - The Fortunes of John and Jane Clemens 5
  • III - A Humble Birthplace 10
  • IV - Beginning a Long Journey 14
  • V - The Way of Fortune 19
  • VI - A New Home 22
  • VII - The Little Town of Hannibal 26
  • VIII - The Farm 31
  • IX - School-Days 35
  • X - Early Vicissitude and Sorrow 41
  • XI - Days of Education 46
  • XII - Tom Sawyer's Band 56
  • XIII - The Gentler Side 67
  • XIV - The Passing of John Clemens 72
  • XV - A Young Ben Franklin 74
  • XVI - The Turning-Point 81
  • XVII - The Hannibal "Journal" 84
  • XVIII - The Beginning of a Literary Life 89
  • XIX - In the Footsteps of Franklin 94
  • XX - Keokuk Days 103
  • XXI - A Scotchman Named Macfarlane 112
  • XXII - The Old Call of the River 116
  • XXIII - The Supreme Science 121
  • XXIV - The River Curriculum 127
  • XXV - Love-Making and Adventure 132
  • XXVI - The Tragedy of the "Pennsylvania" 139
  • XXVII - The Pilot 145
  • XXVIII - Piloting and Prophecy 151
  • XXIX - The End of Piloting 160
  • XXX - The Soldier 163
  • XXXI - Over the Hills and Far Away 170
  • XXXII - The Pionner 174
  • XXXIII - The Prospector 182
  • XXXIV - Territorial Characteristics 188
  • XXXV - The Miner 193
  • XXXVI - Last Mining Days 201
  • XXXVII - The New Estate 205
  • XXXVIII - One of the "Staff" 210
  • XXXIX - Philosophy and Poetry 216
  • XL - Mark Twain 219
  • XLI - The Cream of Comstock Humor 224
  • XLII - Reportorial Days 232
  • XLIII - Artemus Ward 238
  • XLIV - Governor of the "Third House" 243
  • XLV - A Comstock Duel 249
  • XLVI - Getting Settled in San Francisco 253
  • XLVII - Bohemian Days 257
  • XLVIII - The Refuge of the Hills 264
  • XLIX - The Jumping Frog 270
  • L - Back to the Tumult 274
  • LIX - The Corner-Stone 277
  • LII - A Commission to the Sandwich Islands 281
  • LIII - Anson Burlingame and the "Hornet" Disaster 285
  • LIV - The Lecturer 291
  • LV - Highway Robbery 297
  • LVIII - Old Friends and New Plans 308
  • LVIII - A New Book and a Lecture 312
  • LIX - The First Book 318
  • LX - The Innocents at Sea 324
  • LXI - The Innocents Abroad 332
  • LXII - The Return of the Pilgrims 340
  • LXIII - In Washington--A Publishing Proposition 346
  • LXIV - Olivia Langdon 352
  • LXV - A Contract with Elisha Bliss, Jr. 356
  • LXVI - Back to San Francisco 361
  • LXVII - A Visit to Elmira 367
  • LXVIII - The Rev. "Joe" Twichell 370
  • LXIX - A Lecture Tour 373
  • LXX - Innocents at Home--And "The Innocents Abroad" 377
  • LXXI - The Great Book of Travel 382
  • LXXII - The Purchase of a Paper 385
  • LXXIII - The First Meeting with Howells 389
  • LXXIV - The Wedding-Day 391
  • LXXV - As to Destiny 397
  • LXXVI - On the Buffalo "Express" 398
  • LXXVII - The "Galaxy" 403
  • LXXVIII - The Primrose Path 409
  • LXXIX - The Old Human Story 415
  • LXXX - Literary Projects 419
  • LXXXI - Some Further Literary Matters 426
  • LXXXII - The Writing of "Roughing It" 433
  • LXXXIII - Lecturing Days 443
  • LXXXV - A Birth, a Death, and a Voyage 456
  • LXXXVI - England 461
  • LXXXVII - The Book That Was Never Written 465
  • LXXXVIII - The Gilded Age 473
  • LXXXIX - Planning a New Rome 480
  • XC - A Long English Holiday 482
  • XCI - A London Lecture 490
  • XCII - Futher London Lecture Triumphs 495
  • XCIII - The Real Colonel Sellers--Golden Days 501
  • XCIV - Beginning "Tom Sawyer" 505
  • XCV - An "Atlantic" Story and a Play 513
  • XCVI - The New Home 520
  • XCVII - The Walk to Boston 526
  • XCVIII - Old Times on the Mississippi 531
  • XCIX - A Typewriter, and a Joke on Aldrich 535
  • C - Raymond, Mental Telegraphy, Etc. 539
  • CI - Concluding "Tom Sawyer"--Mark Twain's "Editors 547
  • CII - Sketches New and Old 550
  • CIII - Atlantic Days 554
  • CIV - Mark Twain and His Wife 558
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